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Age of the FC Community plus a lot of nostalgia

Discussion in 'Community Discussion' started by lwien, Jul 19, 2015.

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What age range do you fall in.....

  1. 15 ---- 18

  2. 19 ---- 25

  3. 26 ---- 35

  4. 36 ---- 48

  5. 49 ---- 60

  6. 61 ---- 70

  7. 71 +

Results are only viewable after voting.
  1. Hackerman

    Hackerman Expiration Police

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    STOP!!!!! Please stop. I'm an English teacher and you're killing me. LMAO j/k
     
  2. little maggie

    little maggie Well-Known Member

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    Maybe I'm misunderstanding your post but it sounds like you are talking about the days when anorexia was popular or at least bulimia. The post Twiggy days. Women have not fully returned to what was considered a normal weight before that. Most of the teen girls I see are fairly slender. Giant boobs are not really weight related anyway and unless these teens are getting breast surgery they are more related to genetics. (Or are you joking?)
     
  3. DeeCee5

    DeeCee5 Masshole and proud of it

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    63
    Location:
    Massachusetts
    White Gloves?
    Other than my white winter wool gloves, I haven't worn white gloves in over 50 years.
    As I don't get invited to too many high-formal events, I don't see the need for owning a pair of white cotton gloves

    Sorry, I'm not interested in taking a trip back to the fifties and early sixties. where women were treated like second-class citizens.
     
  4. RUDE BOY

    RUDE BOY Space is the Place

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    4,570
    Yeah but they were thin and wore white gloves and hats. . . you can't have everything
     
  5. archangelz001

    archangelz001 FIRE!!

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    363
    Location:
    Bay Area
    What world did you live in? The world of 60's movies? My playground in the 60's was Palo Alto>San Francisco>Berkeley>Santa Cruz Mtns. The women wore tie-dyed flowing skirts and loose tops sans bras. Skinny white-gloved girls were the Twiggy-model wannabes. Not my type. I married one of the others.
     
  6. little maggie

    little maggie Well-Known Member

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    3,235
    I am confused. I remember having to wear white gloves in the fifties and very early sixties when I was very young. But weights in the fifties were not "thin" by todays standards.
     
  7. Hackerman

    Hackerman Expiration Police

    Messages:
    983
    Location:
    ICANN
    Remember Marilyn Monroe? Anything but Twiggy. LOL Times change, as do styles and preferences.

    50's were white gloves and full figured women. Early/mid 60's were Twiggy and Goldie Hawn. Mid/Late 60's were flower child women. By the 80's it was just pretty much fat sloppy broads. LMAO My kingdom for a girl my age with a belly smaller than mine (29") and, hopefully a chest as big (46") ...... LMAO j/k

    Remember The President's Council for Physical Fitness? Wonder what happened to THAT council? Probably old and fat by now. LMAO

    Lots of things besides style have changed since then. ;)
     
    RUDE BOY likes this.
  8. little maggie

    little maggie Well-Known Member

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    3,235
    Time travel to the fifties maybe. I doubt most women would choose that decade though.
     
  9. Hackerman

    Hackerman Expiration Police

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    Location:
    ICANN
    Time travel has always been on my want list. That, and being invisible. Both would be really cool.
     
    ViCKi LEEKX likes this.
  10. t-dub

    t-dub Vapor Sloth

    Messages:
    7,559
    Location:
    Oregon
    My mother has repeatedly told me that the 1950's were the best time of her life. I can understand that as WW2 was over, her and my father were just eloped/married, and the boom generation was starting. They had an awesome 50 years together which she would never change.

    I remember my mother dressing a lot like Doris Day. Vacuuming in high heels and the rest, but she did it because she wanted to. She was a French Canadian, blonde, bombshell that my father put on a pedestal every minute they were together. They met by accident at the submarine base in Groton Connecticut.

    Anyways, the beautiful outfits, the white gloves, the furs etc remind me of a more civilized era, in general, than we have today. Sure we had lecherous bastards back then. Maybe they were worse than Harvey Weinstein today . . . I'm not commenting on that one way or another as my experience obviously didn't include that.

    What I grew up watching was a man and a woman, seriously in love, that treated each other with dignity and respect. They NEVER once fought in front of us and my father worshiped her until he died. He was a paragon of virtue.

    He told us repeatedly growing up that Mom earned 50% of every $$$ that came into the household. Their division of labor worked very well and I will not be driven to guilt by anyone who thinks that "white privilege" or the neighborhoods I lived in had anything to do with this because they didn't.

    The American dream is available for anyone who understands it, respects it, and WORKS to achieve it.

    YMMV . . . :peace:
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2018
  11. Hackerman

    Hackerman Expiration Police

    Messages:
    983
    Location:
    ICANN
    I grew up watching my drunken Dad beat the shit out of my Mom.

    Funny how different 2 families can be. ;)
     
  12. t-dub

    t-dub Vapor Sloth

    Messages:
    7,559
    Location:
    Oregon
    • Not nice. Warning point issued.
    I don't find your comment funny at all and your emoji extremely inappropriate. I seriously doubt your reply is even true, and if it is, maybe in your case the apple doesn't fall far from the tree.

    I can see why you badge yourself as "the fool" . . ..
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2018
    Annie Pepper likes this.
  13. Mr. Gweilo 420

    Mr. Gweilo 420 Dude

    Messages:
    2,108
    Location:
    The Far East
    I thought he meant it sincerely. Its just a stark contrast :2c::peace:
     
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  14. Hackerman

    Hackerman Expiration Police

    Messages:
    983
    Location:
    ICANN
    • Not nice. Warning point issued.
    Fuck you bud. It is absolutely true. You can post lies and bullshit about your make-believe fantasy parents but if I make an honest post about my life you make some rude comment.

    Click the ignore button would you please.
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2018
    GetLeft and Mr. Gweilo 420 like this.
  15. looney2nz

    looney2nz Research Geek, Mad Scientist

    Messages:
    609
    Location:
    So Cal
    everyone take a breath.

    @Hackerman if that was an honest post about your life, I am so sorry :(

    However, you could have left the following sentence as it was, the 'wink' has thrown/inflamed folks. The fact that you posted it in response to @t-dub seemed it could be interpreted as a tweak or shade to his reminiscing. Don't mess with folks 'June & Cleaver' memories, they get VERY janky.

    as for a return to the 1950's, no thanks.

    Can we all try to be a bit more civil now? 2 warning points in a couple posts is too much.
     
  16. Vitolo

    Vitolo Vaporist

    Messages:
    9,320
    Location:
    The Vapor Trail
    While I did not have parents, and grew up in dozens of foster homes... Some of the homes I lived in were as @t-dub described. I also witnessed many other families that lived the same way.. with respect and dignity.

    Sadly, I lived in homes where drunkeness, cruelty and disrespect ruled the household.
    I have both memories, and I enjoy the "June and Ward Cleaver" memories more.
    The memories of the foster homes with cruelty still give me nightmares, at the age of 67.
    I am very happy for you @t-dub.... Your childhood was fantastic. That is why you are the gentleman you are today. I cherish those memories.
    @Hackerman , I am sad for your childhood memories... and I pray that you do not have the same bad dreams that come to me. I am still in therapy, learning how to dismiss, and control how those memories effect me today.

    I see nothing unbelievable in either of your descriptions of your childhood days.
    You spoke wisely. Much respect to you.
     
  17. little maggie

    little maggie Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,235
    Interesting that in a survey most women voted for the fifties as being the best time to be in. But I wonder at what age. During the war, women took over many of the jobs that men had in non war time. Then had to leave those jobs and focus on marriage and children. The Cleavers could only be a product of the fifties and only from certain parts of the country.
     
  18. ViCKi LEEKX

    ViCKi LEEKX Fuck Vaporizer Combustion

    Messages:
    84
    I’m definitely not trying to go back to the 1950s. The school I got my degree from didn’t go coed ‘til the 1980s and my profession became a career around the same time.

    My husband is definitely not trying to go back to the 1950s either. He thinks it’s great that I outearn him by a considerable amount, which allows him extra freedom to choose a fulfilling occupation and enjoy his income without having to pay the household bills.
     
  19. macbill

    macbill Gregarious Misanthrope

    Messages:
    3,973
    Location:
    The Evergreen State
    Shirley, we all want to go back to when the top tax rate was 90%. That's how we built the Interstate system. Huzzah!
     
  20. CarolKing

    CarolKing Singer of songs and a vapor connoisseur

    I know my mom instilled in me something different than I instilled in my daughter. I raised my daughter to be self sufficient and not to rely on someone to support her financially. That gives both partners more freedom to live a fulfilling life and not to be dependent on someone else.

    I remember my mom telling me, “the man is the head of the household. When talking to your boyfriend talk to him about things he likes to talk about.” My mom was like a June Cleaver but my dad was no Ward Cleaver. My dad was more like Archie Bunker. My dad wasn’t lovable though like Archie Bunker was. I would realize a few times he was an old softie. He wouldn’t let many people see that side of him.

    My dad was an alcoholic for many years. Eventually he did quit when I was about 10 years old. He still displayed alcoholic tendencies and was very verballay abusive to his wife and children. Verbal abuse doesn’t leave any visible marks. It leaves lasting emotional damage.

    Another thought. The Cleavers always seemed to have plenty of money and lived in a beautiful house at the time, good neighborhood. The dad had a good job. Many folks struggled to be middle income back in the 1960s. My dad was in the military so my family traveled a lot in the early years. I would see these TV shows and wished my life was like them. Not like All In The Family but like the Cleavers, the Nelson Family and Father Knows Best. As a young kid you don’t realize the tv shows were make believe.

    @t-dub I loved hearing about your mom and dad’s love story. It actually made me cry. A beautiful love story, thank you for sharing that.
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2018
  21. BornAgainSteama

    BornAgainSteama baa

    Messages:
    274
    what? huh? emmh, what?

    :myday:
     
  22. ClearBlueLou

    ClearBlueLou unbearably light in the being....

    Messages:
    635
    Location:
    the Old Confederacy
    I remember the fifties all too well. There were good things, good times, good people, but there were bad times, too, and bad people, and a lot of bad things happened. I just happened to be in the segregated and unairconditioned south. Sometimes the best thing and the worst thing would happen right up next to each other.

    My family story is a bit like t-dub’s, and part of it is like hackerman’s.
    I spent a lot of years wishing it were one or the other: trying to navigate it all was too much for an over smart, hyper observant sensitive kid.

    I became who and how I am on purpose. I didn’t always know I was becoming, but I’ve tried hard to be true to myself, be honest, and be kind to people. There’s a real good chance that I could do it all over again and have wildly different outcomes, having been thru it once, but I know how hard it was to get here - and there’s no telling that I could in fact do it differently unless something WAS different.

    Ah, well, Saturday night...
     
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  23. little maggie

    little maggie Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    3,235
    I grew up in the fifties but in a pretty atypical family. My mother worked and then went out with her boyfriend. She was never home and I didn't get the messages most kids my age did. Was there abuse. If someone told me their story and it was identical to mine I would say yes now. But I was a pretty oblivious kid and couldn't figure out whether what was going on was "normal" and whether all families were like mine or whether it was different. And I never could figure out why the lps were broken in the morning. I just was odd and never could figure out the social rules but got by because I was smart in school. (And yes for those who have read my posts- I'm still a bit odd. But I kind of "woke up" in my forties so am much better than I was."
     
    DeeCee5, t-dub, ViCKi LEEKX and 9 others like this.
  24. t-dub

    t-dub Vapor Sloth

    Messages:
    7,559
    Location:
    Oregon
    I want to apologize to everyone, including the recipient, of my last remark. It was NOT well thought out, not polite, and I regret it very much. I will endeavor to provide FC with content in the future that is more civilized in nature and I really appreciate everyone's viewpoints here. All experiences are valid and real. Sometimes it can be hard to look beyond one's own experience. I promise to be completely respectful to all other vantage points in the future to prevent discord in the community.

    Just an interesting side, my mother and father had nothing when they eloped. My father's first job was selling encyclopedias for Britannica door to door. Once when he left the house, my mother told him there was no money in the checking account to pay the rent. My dad told her to write the check anyways and that he wouldn't come home until he had made enough money selling encyclopedias to cover it. Which he did. Their story just gets more amazing from that point on.

    Before that he was born in a sod hut (meaning dirt and grass) on a Colorado prairie near Villas in the early 1930's. Homesteaders, wiped out by the dust bowl, its an incredible story of sickness, hardship, transcending social class, and ultimately personal victory though endless personal transformation and really, really, hard work.

    Anyways, thanks for being there FC, I really value our relationship . . . :peace:
     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2018
    RUDE BOY, GetLeft, Whisper and 14 others like this.
  25. GetLeft

    GetLeft Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,050
    Location:
    Convection City
    Zero to nine in the sixties, ten to nineteen in the seventies, etc. I belong culturally to the seventies but feel nostalgically connected to the sixties. Funny how that works. Parents were children of the early thirties and culturally more of the forties, WWII mindset. I never perceived them to be particularly connected in any way to the fifties culture even though they were in their prime then. I always got the sense that they thought they were cooler than the fifties. Just like I think I'm cooler (lots) than the eighties. :peace: @t-dub, thanks man.
     

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