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Dynavap VapCap

Discussion in 'Portable Vaporizers' started by Fenton Mewley, Jul 21, 2015.

  1. stardustsailor

    stardustsailor Well-Known Member Accessory Maker

    Messages:
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    Location:
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    Yes ,indeed Titanium has ~40% to 50% less density than most stainless steel alloys ,
    while at the same time is as strong as most stainless steel alloys.

    And to be more precise ,it does not get scratched easier than stainless steel .
    Actually it gets scratched less than stainless steel.
    But it gals .It "sticks" lot easier than stainless steel .
    Severe friction between titanium surfaces ,results in galling.

    "Galling is a form of wear caused by adhesion between sliding surfaces. When a material galls, some of it is pulled with the contacting surface, especially if there is a large amount of force compressing the surfaces together. Galling is caused by a combination of friction and adhesion between the surfaces, followed by slipping and tearing of crystal structure beneath the surface. This will generally leave some material stuck or even friction welded to the adjacent surface, whereas the galled material may appear gouged with balled-up or torn lumps of material stuck to its surface.

    Galling is most commonly found in metal surfaces that are in sliding contact with each other. It is especially common where there is inadequate lubrication between the surfaces. However, certain metals will generally be more prone to galling, due to the atomic structure of their crystals. For example, aluminium is a metal that will gall very easily, whereas annealed (softened) steel is slightly more resistant to galling. Steel that is fully hardened is very resistant to galling.

    Galling is a common problem in most applications where metals slide while in contact with other metals. This can happen regardless of whether the metals are the same or of different kinds. Alloys such as brass and bronze are often chosen for bearings, bushings, and other sliding applications because of their resistance to galling, as well as other forms of mechanical abrasion.
    "
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Galling

    Cheers.
     
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2017
  2. kuzko

    kuzko Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    294
    Is there an easy fix to create more airflow? I find myself struggling to inhale sometimes. I’m using an M tip.
     
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  3. IntoTheVoid

    IntoTheVoid Pride Goeth Before A Fall

    Messages:
    172
    Location:
    Canada
    So from what I am seeing there is that it wasn’t scratches on the condenser, it was material from the inside of the tip rubbing off and attaching to the condenser due to the properties of the metal. Interesting, some of the “scratches” did feel raised up so makes sense. Either way, steel wool and vim took it right off. Lol
     
  4. stardustsailor

    stardustsailor Well-Known Member Accessory Maker

    Messages:
    980
    Location:
    14-23-5-932-941
    Or creating more negative pressure than more airflow,as another alternative ?
    Mouthpulls is the answer to that ...
    ;)
     
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  5. cybrguy

    cybrguy I mean really, WTF

    Messages:
    6,196
    Is it me or is there a little more airflow in the Omni? It seems like I might even be able to lung pull with it, tho I really haven't yet.

    This is, of course, with the new tip. It is the only gen5 tipped VC I have.
     
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  6. stardustsailor

    stardustsailor Well-Known Member Accessory Maker

    Messages:
    980
    Location:
    14-23-5-932-941
    Moving condenser + carb hole = set and forget ,sweet equilibrium position between draw resistance and vapor density & temperature .

    The unique feature of OMNI models .
    ;)
     
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  7. CuckFumbustion

    CuckFumbustion Lo and Behold! The transformative power of Vapor.

    Messages:
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    Location:
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    I took a piece of silicone tubing and stuffed it on the end of my Dynatube and pressed a magnet inside. So I had a cooling magnet and a cap puller. The other option is to carry the tips pre-filled in another tube.
    There are other minimalist /cheap ideas, I'm sure. Didn't have much luck with my search with ordinary dugouts to modify. Always looking at other design options too.
    [​IMG]

    SS for cookware is all about scratches. So I'm guessing other than cosmetic, it should be fine. Ti as a material however? I would like to hear more thoughts about scratched Titanium and foodsafe concerns. Also how reactive it is.
    A page or two ago, there was pics of 'M' tips edged to work like Ti tips.
     
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2017
  8. cybrguy

    cybrguy I mean really, WTF

    Messages:
    6,196
    Just to be clear it feels like more airflow _with the air hole covered_. Something other than the omni function. Could be something specific to the cap. I haven't swapped caps to check.
     
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  9. Winegums

    Winegums I make things from wood Accessory Maker

    Messages:
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    Location:
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    Ti is biologically inert, it's used in medical implants due to this property, combined with it's natural strength and low density. Anything that was scratched off the vaporizer parts would be treated like a dust particle by your body.

    From Wikipedia:
    Precautions
    Titanium is non-toxic even in large doses and does not play any natural role inside the human body.[23] An estimated quantity of 0.8 milligrams of titanium is ingested by humans each day, but most passes through without being absorbed in the tissues.[23] It does, however, sometimes bio-accumulate in tissues that contain silica. One study indicates a possible connection between titanium and yellow nail syndrome.[100] An unknown mechanism in plants may use titanium to stimulate the production of carbohydrates and encourage growth. This may explain why most plants contain about 1 part per million (ppm) of titanium, food plants have about 2 ppm, and horsetail and nettle contain up to 80 ppm.[23]
     
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  10. kuzko

    kuzko Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    294
    Found the video, thanks! I think I’ll try this on my M tip. For some reason after I washed all of the components of my Ti woody , my Ti tip barely squeezes onto the wood stem and there’s ZERO airflow, even with carb wide open, but then if I switch it out for the M tip the airflow is normal again, still less than I like though.
     
  11. stardustsailor

    stardustsailor Well-Known Member Accessory Maker

    Messages:
    980
    Location:
    14-23-5-932-941
    If someone ,out from this forum ,ought to be really concerned about this is myself for sure !
    The textures I'm creating at the titanium stems produce lots -and I mean LOTS - of Titanium particulate matter aka dust .
    Ranging from really fine ( ~ PM 0.1 ) to quite thick (>PM 1000 ).
    I can tell from the mask filters I use ...
    I have it all over me ,lately.
    Black titanium dust .
    Apart from combusting myself and get vaporised by exploding ,
    I do not worry for anything else really ...
    ;)

    "Precautions
    Nettles contain up to 80 parts per million of titanium.
    Titanium is non-toxic even in large doses and does not play any natural role inside the human body.[23] An estimated quantity of 0.8 milligrams of titanium is ingested by humans each day, but most passes through without being absorbed in the tissues.[23] It does, however, sometimes bio-accumulate in tissues that contain silica. One study indicates a possible connection between titanium and yellow nail syndrome.[100] An unknown mechanism in plants may use titanium to stimulate the production of carbohydrates and encourage growth. This may explain why most plants contain about 1 part per million (ppm) of titanium, food plants have about 2 ppm, and horsetail and nettle contain up to 80 ppm.[23]

    As a powder or in the form of metal shavings, titanium metal poses a significant fire hazard and, when heated in air, an explosion hazard.[101] Water and carbon dioxide are ineffective for extinguishing a titanium fire; Class D dry powder agents must be used instead.[8]

    When used in the production or handling of chlorine, titanium should not be exposed to dry chlorine gas because it may result in a titanium–chlorine fire.[102] Even wet chlorine presents a fire hazard when extreme weather conditions cause unexpected drying.

    Titanium can catch fire when a fresh, non-oxidized surface comes in contact with liquid oxygen.[103] Fresh metal may be exposed when the oxidized surface is struck or scratched with a hard object, or when mechanical strain causes a crack. This poses a limitation to its use in liquid oxygen systems, such as those in the aerospace industry. Because titanium tubing impurities can cause fires when exposed to oxygen, titanium is prohibited in gaseous oxygen respiration systems. Steel tubing is used for high pressure systems (3,000 p.s.i.) and aluminium tubing for low pressure systems.
    "

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Titanium

    Some seem to fear more ,but based more on indications,rather than on proven facts
    and the concerns are about TiO2 (Titanium Dioxide ) and not metallic titanium :
    https://www.globalhealingcenter.com/natural-health/health-risks-of-titanium/

    Others state differently :
    "Health effects of titanium

    There is no known biological role for titanium. There is a detectable amount of titanium in the human body and it has been estimated that we take in about 0.8 mg/day, but most passes through us without being adsorbed. It is not a poison metal and the human body can tolerate titanium in large dose.
    Elemental titanium and titanium dioxide is of a low order of toxicity. Laboratory animals (rats) exposed to titanium dioxide via inhalation have developed small-localized areas of dark-colored dust deposits in the lungs. Excessive exposure in humans may result in slight changes in the lungs.

    Effects of overexposure to titanium powder: Dust inhalation may cause tightness and pain in chest, coughing, and difficulty in breathing. Contact with skin or eyes may cause irritation. Routes of entry: Inhalation, skin contact, eye contact."
    https://www.lenntech.com/periodic/elements/ti.htm

    Carcinogenicity: The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has listed titanium dioxide within Group 3 (The agent is not classifiable as to its carcinogenicity to humans.)

    Environmental effects of titanium
    Low toxicity. When in a metallic powdered form, titanium metal poses a significant fire hazard and, when heated in air, an explosion hazard.
    No environmental effects have been reported.
    "

    https://www.lenntech.com/periodic/elements/ti.htm
    Read more: https://www.lenntech.com/periodic/elements/ti.htm#ixzz50isAWfjP

    Still,personally I wear a mask when working with Ti ,
    while always having a class D fire extinguisher near by ,just in case !
    :cool:

    Oh ,Ok ...:tinfoil:
    ...:uhoh:



    PS/EDIT :
    BTW ...
    Other than Titanium,as candidate materials for vaporising devices and their safety :

    Borosilicate glass (aka : Borcam, Borosil, DURAN, Suprax, Simax, BSA 60, BSC 51 (By NIPRO), Heatex, Endural, Schott, Refmex, Kimble & Pyrex )

    " Borosilicate is widely used in implantable medical devices such as prosthetic eyes,
    artificial hip joints, bone cements, dental composite materials (white fillings)
    and even in breast implants."

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Borosilicate_glass

    "
    V. HEALTH HAZARD INFORMATION
    Effects of Exposure:
    This is a non-combustible, non-reactive solid material. It is supplied in the form of glass sheets or powder. Exposure to glass powder or dusts may be irritating to eyes, nose and throat. At very high exposure levels the dust may have an effect on the lungs.


    Acute Effects:
    Inhalation: Dusts of this product may cause irritation of the nose, throat, and respiratory tract. When inhaled in very large amounts, damage to the lung can occur.
    Ingestion: May cause temporary irritation of the throat, stomach, and gastrointestinal tract.
    Skin: No components in this product are known to be absorbed through the skin. Dust or powder may irritate the skin. Mechanical rubbing may increase skin irritation.
    Eye: Dust or powder may irritate eye tissue. Rubbing may cause abrasion of cornea.
    Carcinogenicity: NTP: No IARC: No OSHA Regulated: No

    "
    http://www.espimetals.com/index.php/msds/512-Borosilicate

    NIOBIUM ( Nb )
    Precautions
    Niobium has no known biological role. While niobium dust is an eye and skin irritant and a potential fire hazard, elemental niobium on a larger scale is physiologically inert (and thus hypoallergenic) and harmless. It is frequently used in jewelry and has been tested for use in some medical implants.
    Niobium-containing compounds are rarely encountered by most people, but some are toxic and should be treated with care. The short- and long-term exposure to niobates and niobium chloride, two chemicals that are water-soluble, have been tested in rats. Rats treated with a single injection of niobium pentachloride or niobates show a median lethal dose (LD50) between 10 and 100 mg/kg. For oral administration the toxicity is lower; a study with rats yielded a LD50 after seven days of 940 mg/kg.


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Niobium

    Tantalum ( Ta )
    Precautions
    Compounds containing tantalum are rarely encountered in the laboratory. The metal is highly biocompatible and is used for body implants and coatings, therefore attention may be focused on other elements or the physical nature of the chemical compound.
    People can be exposed to tantalum in the workplace by breathing it in, skin contact, or eye contact. The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has set the legal limit (permissible exposure limit) for tantalum exposure in the workplace as 5 mg/m3 over an 8-hour workday. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has set a recommended exposure limit (REL) of 5 mg/m3 over an 8-hour workday and a short-term limit of 10 mg/m3. At levels of 2500 mg/m3, tantalum is immediately dangerous to life and health.


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tantalum

    Stainless steel ( mainly the 316 L )
    Health effects
    Stainless steel is generally considered to be biologically inert, but some sensitive individuals develop a skin irritation due to a nickel allergy caused by certain alloys.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stainless_steel
    https://ehssafetynewsamerica.com/2010/05/02/osha-targets-exposure-to-stainless-steel-hazards/
     
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2017
  12. cybrguy

    cybrguy I mean really, WTF

    Messages:
    6,196
    Earlier posts reminded me about something else I wanted to bring up. Several folks have been talking about carrying around several preloaded tips and swapping them out rather than having to load tips repeatedly. I get the interest in this, and it may even work out for the M and the Ti Omni, but I would highly discourage this on wood stems and bodies. With the metal components the worst thing likely to happen is having to replace your orings more often as they degrade from repeated removal and replacement of the tip. But wood may well weaken leading to cracks or just mushiness (technical term) in the wood reducing its stability and tightness. Maybe it won't happen, but I suspect it would. Softer woods would of course be worse than harder woods.
    So, as long as you don't mind having to replace the wood body or stem earlier than it might otherwise be necessary, this may not be an issue. But if you do care you might want to reconsider this idea.
     
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  13. Summer

    Summer Well-Known Member

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    2,232
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  14. Winegums

    Winegums I make things from wood Accessory Maker

    Messages:
    1,747
    Location:
    The Fraser Valley
    This is what I noticed with some of my early stems that weren't lined with metal. I've retired three of them due to the tip starting to wobble in the socket or fall out. This is most likely due to me only having one tip at the time and I frequently swapped it from stem to stem. I recommend not swapping in and out of wood bodies every day or more frequently than needed for cleaning.

    I'm kinda curious how Viton vs Silicone o-rings effect the wear rate. Since the Viton rings get hard from compression and heat they would be more abrasive when charged with dirt and dust particles. I haven't used all wood stems since I switched to silicone so I can't say for sure that the softer material would abrade less.

    It's worth noting that the woods Dynavap uses for stems are very hard and will wear slowly.
     
    Last edited: Dec 8, 2017
  15. Sir-vapes-a-lot

    Sir-vapes-a-lot Member

    Messages:
    18
    Location:
    BC, Canada
    Well, there goes my plan to sell beryllium stems...
     
  16. stardustsailor

    stardustsailor Well-Known Member Accessory Maker

    Messages:
    980
    Location:
    14-23-5-932-941
    I've had thoughts about Beryllium stems ,myself.
    Stong and the lightest of any other metal !
    But ...

    "The commercial use of beryllium requires the use of appropriate dust control equipment and industrial controls at all times because of the toxicity of inhaled beryllium-containing dusts that can cause a chronic life-threatening allergic disease in some people called berylliosis. "

    "Occupational safety and health
    Beryllium is a health and safety issue for workers. Exposure to beryllium in the workplace can lead to a sensitization immune response and can over time develop chronic beryllium disease (CBD).[91] The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) in the United States researches these effects in collaboration with a major manufacturer of beryllium products. The goal of this research is to prevent sensitization and CBD by developing a better understanding of the work processes and exposures that may present a potential risk for workers, and to develop effective interventions that will reduce the risk for adverse health effects. NIOSH also conducts genetic research on sensitization and CBD, independently of this collaboration.[91] The NIOSH Manual of Analytical Methods contains methods for measuring occupational exposures to beryllium.[92]

    Precautions
    Main articles: Acute beryllium poisoning and Berylliosis
    Approximately 35 micrograms of beryllium is found in the average human body, an amount not considered harmful.[93] Beryllium is chemically similar to magnesium and therefore can displace it from enzymes, which causes them to malfunction.[93] Because Be2+ is a highly charged and small ion, it can easily get into many tissues and cells, where it specifically targets cell nuclei, inhibiting many enzymes, including those used for synthesizing DNA. Its toxicity is exacerbated by the fact that the body has no means to control beryllium levels, and once inside the body the beryllium cannot be removed.[94] Chronic berylliosis is a pulmonary and systemic granulomatous disease caused by inhalation of dust or fumes contaminated with beryllium; either large amounts over a short time or small amounts over a long time can lead to this ailment. Symptoms of the disease can take up to five years to develop; about a third of patients with it die and the survivors are left disabled.[93] The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) lists beryllium and beryllium compounds as Category 1 carcinogens.[95] In the US, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) has designated a permissible exposure limit (PEL) in the workplace with a time-weighted average (TWA) 0.002 mg/m3 and a constant exposure limit of 0.005 mg/m3 over 30 minutes, with a maximum peak limit of 0.025 mg/m3. The National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) has set a recommended exposure limit (REL) of constant 0.0005 mg/m3. The IDLH (immediately dangerous to life and health) value is 4 mg/m3.[96]

    The toxicity of finely divided beryllium (dust or powder, mainly encountered in industrial settings where beryllium is produced or machined) is very well-documented. Solid beryllium metal does not carry the same hazards as airborne inhaled dust, but any hazard associated with physical contact is poorly documented. Workers handling finished beryllium pieces are routinely advised to handle them with gloves, both as a precaution and because many if not most applications of beryllium cannot tolerate residue of skin contact such as fingerprints.

    Acute beryllium disease in the form of chemical pneumonitis was first reported in Europe in 1933 and in the United States in 1943. A survey found that about 5% of workers in plants manufacturing fluorescent lamps in 1949 in the United States had beryllium-related lung diseases.[97] Chronic berylliosis resembles sarcoidosis in many respects, and the differential diagnosis is often difficult. It killed some early workers in nuclear weapons design, such as Herbert L. Anderson.[98]

    Beryllium may be found in coal slag. When the slag is formulated into an abrasive agent for blasting paint and rust from hard surfaces, the beryllium can become airborne and become a source of exposure.[99]

    Early researchers tasted beryllium and its various compounds for sweetness in order to verify its presence. Modern diagnostic equipment no longer necessitates this highly risky procedure and no attempt should be made to ingest this highly toxic substance.[5] Beryllium and its compounds should be handled with great care and special precautions must be taken when carrying out any activity which could result in the release of beryllium dust (lung cancer is a possible result of prolonged exposure to beryllium-laden dust). Although the use of beryllium compounds in fluorescent lighting tubes was discontinued in 1949, potential for exposure to beryllium exists in the nuclear and aerospace industries and in the refining of beryllium metal and melting of beryllium-containing alloys, the manufacturing of electronic devices, and the handling of other beryllium-containing material.[100]

    A successful test for beryllium in air and on surfaces has been recently developed and published as an international voluntary consensus standard ASTM D7202. The procedure uses dilute ammonium bifluoride for dissolution and fluorescence detection with beryllium bound to sulfonated hydroxybenzoquinoline, allowing up to 100 times more sensitive detection than the recommended limit for beryllium concentration in the workplace. Fluorescence increases with increasing beryllium concentration. The new procedure has been successfully tested on a variety of surfaces and is effective for the dissolution and ultratrace detection of refractory beryllium oxide and siliceous beryllium (ASTM D7458).[101][102]

    "
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Beryllium
     
  17. phattpiggie

    phattpiggie Well-Known Member Accessory Maker

    Messages:
    2,173
    Last edited: Dec 9, 2017
    Zecrono, VapCap, Cowputer and 15 others like this.
  18. Winegums

    Winegums I make things from wood Accessory Maker

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    Location:
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    Do all the caps click roughly at the same time?
     
  19. mrb

    mrb Accessory Maker

    Messages:
    346
    Location:
    UK
    The man from Vapcap stikes again... Amazing.
    Thanks for the heads up @Summer
    And lovely looking work @stardustsailor - very nice.
     
  20. phattpiggie

    phattpiggie Well-Known Member Accessory Maker

    Messages:
    2,173
    @Winegums they click as you spin it one after the other.
    Put a massive smile on my face the first time I used the triple stem.
     
  21. sag

    sag Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    89
    Location:
    Oregon
    Here is what i used before I decided on my permanent solution for storage

    https://imgur.com/a/Va2BY

    [​IMG]
     
  22. JCharles

    JCharles FC 06/06/2017 | ACMPR 26/07/2017

    Messages:
    450
    Location:
    Toronto, Canada
    Does anyone use the small dynavap storage container? The ones you squeeze to open?

    I'm asking because either I have mutant powers or they are poorly designed. I've broken three this week trying to open them.

    Small squeeze on the sides and they just crack and become useless.

    They were only $0.80, but I expect more than two or three uses from them.
     
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  23. tragique

    tragique Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    194
    Does anyone have comprehensive information on the various M versions? I have a few M's here and I noticed my earlier one has more rounded fins and other small changes compared to the ones I ordered later on. I'm curious how it all evolved from the beta models to the current model you can buy now.
     
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  24. Winegums

    Winegums I make things from wood Accessory Maker

    Messages:
    1,747
    Location:
    The Fraser Valley
    When I replenish my stash I'll have to make a triple and give it a whack. I've tried double vapcaps into a claisen but the difficult part is heating two at once.
     
  25. pxl_jockey

    pxl_jockey Barely-Known Member

    Messages:
    839
    Location:
    Lost in the English countryside
    Although I'm primarily in it for effect & flavour, I've been getting huge clouds with the OmniXL. So smooth it tricks me, taking in more than my poor lungs can cope with. Sometimes I think I'm getting bigger, more dense clouds than with my Nano?! I'm not saying that lightly, I've considered how crazy it sounds. The fact is this tiny, lightweight piece of engineering can produce more on-demand vapor than I can handle.

    One of the things I looked forward to most was the adjustabowl ti tip, so after much testing, I prefer (right now) the largest setting lol. Same as it ever was! Also FWIW: with the M, first hit was flavourful but wispy; with Omni, first hit is always substantial for me. Not sure what, if anything, I make of it but it's the truth.

    Yes, the M is great value for money and if it was the only device DynaVap made, I would be satisfied. I was satisfied for months but now I also say the Omni range is worth it, every cent. It's more EVERYTHING.
     
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