Vaping in "adult life"

YaMon

Vaping since 2010
We'd all drive electric cars that only go up to 50mph.
Does that mean I may not have one supercharged, turbocharged, internal combustion propelled bad ass 700hp restomod and I am relegated to putz around in a Prius? I know what fossil fuel and plastics are doing, I just really like explosions under the hood or between my legs. :cry:
 

uncanni

Well-Known Member
That's the world I want my kids to grow up in.
That's the world I want your kids to grow up in, too. When I was growing up in the 50s-60s, my mom would get so disgusted with the shit on television that she'd give the tv away, and we'd have to read books. That's how I fell in love with reading books, and it breaks my heart to see these generation z kids who can read social media all day, but can't concentrate sufficiently to read a book.

@YaMon How about a horse?
 

EverythingsHazy

Well-Known Member
No one wants poverty, so that's an odd question. No one wants to be part of a low or underclass. That means economic marginalization in a word.
Very few would prefer to live in a low economic class, but some people would be ok with it, or even content with such a life, if it meant that they didn't have to do certain things. It's kind of like being fit or having an unhealthy body. Very few if any people would prefer to be overweight, but there are those who are ok with it, as long as it means that they don't have to exercise or be concerned with their eating habits.

I would never want to be upper class and have so much more (unnecessary) wealth than others. What does someone do with a billion dollars? I mean, really, what the fk can you do with it??? I'm a humanities professor; you know I ain't in it for the money.
Why not? Having more than others doesn't mean you are hurting them. Having wealth allows you to make change in the world, and if you have good intentions, you can have a big, positive impact on he world, if you have a ton of money.

If I had hundreds of millions, or billions of dollars, I would be able to do far more to help those in need. I'd be able to do more than donate a few hundred to relief causes. I'd be able to rescue thousands of dogs and cats, feed thousands of homeless people, get children out of dangerous homes, etc..

In airplanes, they tell you to put on your own oxygen mask before helping your kids with theirs. It sounds selfish, but it's not. If you don't have the resources you need (oxygen), you may pass out before you can help them, and then you might both die.

If I lived in a world without global warming, I imagine it would be a world where fossil fuel production was terminated; I imagine a return to acting and living locally, with all your foods coming from the region where you live. No more of this shipping lettuce from California to Rhode Island or whatever. I imagine all travel being slower and diminished: people would work locally.

Without all those trucks that have become a blight on our existence on the road, all kinds of jobs would disappear and new types of work would be created, with fair and equitable salaries for everyone. We'd all drive electric cars that only go up to 50mph.

I imagine a lof of other things about this utopia of mine, but I know that by definition, a utopia is an imagining and no more. But that's the world I'd like to live in, which I guess affiliates me to Luddism and deep ecology...
That's all interesting, as it seems like it would be a simpler world, where life resembles the per-intustrial revolution era, more than the current era. As much as I would like a break form the high-paced "rat race", I can't say that I'd prefer not being able to eat certain foods because they can't be grown in my state.
 

happynomoretobacco

Well-Known Member
That's the world I want my kids to grow up in.
maybe it sounds pathetic - but its on us make the world like this!!
but its hard because we have to start at ourselves with changings - there are a lot of nice things which nobody needs but we all like - to dont want because its better for ALL its a really bad job nobody wants to do - me including but i try in some points...
 
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uncanni

Well-Known Member
Very few would prefer to live in a low economic class, but some people would be ok with it,
You and I clearly don't understand "low econ. class" the same way. I don't know what group you're referring to, but nobody wants to live in poverty, with all of the deprivations that accompanies poverty. If you don't understand the kinds of deprivations that poverty in this country brings, it's because you really don't know anything about it. You live an insulated life. I've studied sociology and cultural theory for decades because it's important to me.

Having more than others doesn't mean you are hurting them.
I'd say that you know nothing about white privelege.

I would like a break form the high-paced "rat race"
I'm not surprised that you say you're part of the rat race. Good luck with that.

You and I live in two distinct worlds, so to speak.
 

EverythingsHazy

Well-Known Member
I don't know why you've responded as if I said something offensive. The point I made was that certain jobs are fit for providing certain levels of money. That's a fact. If you want to sell $10 string bracelets that you make, on etsy, the odds are that you aren't going to be able to afford a luxury car, a beachfront house, or week long vacations to other countries, if you don't have another source of income.

You and I clearly don't understand "low econ. class" the same way. I don't know what group you're referring to, but nobody wants to live in poverty, with all of the deprivations that accompanies poverty.
First of all, I never said anything about wanting to be poor. I said that some people don't mind the trade-offs that come with being in a lower economic class. If you are content with a very modest life, with little luxury, you don't need a lot of money, and working extra hard to earn more money might not be worthwhile for you.

Some people are content sitting on their front porch rocking chair, and knitting day in and day out, until they die. If that works for them, great. They don't have to push for a high paying job, or a college degree.

If you don't understand the kinds of deprivations that poverty in this country brings, it's because you really don't know anything about it. You live an insulated life. I've studied sociology and cultural theory for decades because it's important to me.
This is an assumption, and a false one, at that. You know next to nothing about my life. Jumping to conclusions, and being somewhat hostile, is pointless.

I'd say that you know nothing about white privelege
I'm not even going to entertain this one.
 

conanOrien

Active Member
This is totally off topic for this thread but I'm diving in.

First I just wanted to specify that uncanni's post didn't come off as defensive to me, or otherwise give the impression that she was responding to something that offended her.

First of all, I never said anything about wanting to be poor. I said that some people don't mind the trade-offs that come with being in a lower economic class. If you are content with a very modest life, with little luxury, you don't need a lot of money, and working extra hard to earn more money might not be worthwhile for you.

Some people are content sitting on their front porch rocking chair, and knitting day in and day out, until they die. If that works for them, great. They don't have to push for a high paying job, or a college degree.

For a lot of people, economic status isn't a choice. While all humans are created equal, they are not necessarily subjected to the same experiences, situations, etc. My point is that "Working extra hard" is not the only ingredient to attaining capital, and even consciously choosing to work extra hard may not get you there.

Coming from my point of view, economically privileged and living in the US my whole life: If you feel that you can ascend classes easily you do not understand how serious the disparity between those classes are.

Also, just wanted to round out my reply by amplifying the earlier stated message: having more money is not an inherently good thing. More money just gives you more options. You could do a lot of good and bad things with money. You can even do things that seem universally positive but really disproportionately benefit you in the end. It's not a universal problem solver. A lot of rich people donate big bucks to good causes, and just as many cling to their wealth.
 

Summer

Long Island, NY
First I just wanted to specify that uncanni's post didn't come off as defensive to me, or otherwise give the impression that she was responding to something that offended her.

She/he came on strong/harsh in reply to EV, imo. [*Remember these are just posted words without face &/or voice gestures behind them to differentiate intent. (That's why I so love smilies. ;))]

But I agree this is not the place for this discussion - should have a thread of it's own. Could be a lively discussion.
 

EverythingsHazy

Well-Known Member
This is totally off topic for this thread but I'm diving in.
I think it fit itself into the conversation, along with the whole idea that it's fine to vape as you wish, if you're an adult, as long as you don't let it hold you back. If you aspire to be a multimillionaire, sitting at home and getting high every day while playing your harmonica isn't the best idea.

For a lot of people, economic status isn't a choice. While all humans are created equal, they are not necessarily subjected to the same experiences, situations, etc. My point is that "Working extra hard" is not the only ingredient to attaining capital, and even consciously choosing to work extra hard may not get you there.

Coming from my point of view, economically privileged and living in the US my whole life: If you feel that you can ascend classes easily you do not understand how serious the disparity between those classes are.
I'm well aware that hard work alone isn't good enough for everyone, in every situation. My point wasn't that you will get rich if you work hard. It's that certain occupation choices are better suited for different desired income levels. Not everyone would be happy with the life of a CEO who makes $100m/year, but works so much that he rarely sees his family and friends, and misses most of his children's milestones. Your preferred lifestyle is worth considering, when deciding on how you are going to try to make money.

She/he came on strong/harsh in reply to EV, imo. [*Remember these are just posted words without face &/or voice gestures behind them to differentiate intent. (That's why I so love smilies. ;))]

But I agree this is not the place for this discussion - should have a thread of it's own. Could be a lively discussion.
What should the thread title be? Let's make one in the Lounge.
 

Summer

Long Island, NY
What should the thread title be?

It's gotta be good & snappy. I'll reread the posts when I'm not being lazy :spliff:, & see if I can think of anything - albeit that I suck @ thread titles. :lol:

What I can do is, once the thread is started, pm Stu & ask him to move the above posts over. :tup: Then we can all reread the transferred posts & go forward with replies. It'll be fun & intellectually stimulating. :)
 
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uncanni

Well-Known Member
To all and sundry, and especially EverythingsHazy

I apologize because I came off condescending and angry. I teach at a small public HBCU in the dirty south, and I've been seeing every day what poverty and economic and cultural marginalization do to people: it fks them up.

EH, I wouldn't want to live poor because the problems destroy people body and mind: poorer neighborhoods, more criminal activity because of lack of skills or gainful employment and because that's the only way some folks can make a little paper, mediocre schools, lack of preparation for higher education, poor diets (I have students in their early 20s with health problems like diverticulitis from a lifetime of lousy diet), and all the emotional trauma, anger and depression that come with worrying about money.

So that's what I was thinking about when I read your reply and responded. Before I took this job, I lived a pretty segregated life, but living in a predominantly African American small city in the dirty south, and working with my students every day, meeting their folks, going to their houses, maintaing relationships with them for years because they love to be cared about, for over a decade I've been learning how poverty works in this region. The injustice does disgust me and make me very angry. I won't take it out on the forum again.
 

happynomoretobacco

Well-Known Member
To all and sundry, and especially EverythingsHazy

I apologize because I came off condescending and angry. I teach at a small public HBCU in the dirty south, and I've been seeing every day what poverty and economic and cultural marginalization do to people: it fks them up.

EH, I wouldn't want to live poor because the problems destroy people body and mind: poorer neighborhoods, more criminal activity because of lack of skills or gainful employment and because that's the only way some folks can make a little paper, mediocre schools, lack of preparation for higher education, poor diets (I have students in their early 20s with health problems like diverticulitis from a lifetime of lousy diet), and all the emotional trauma, anger and depression that come with worrying about money.

So that's what I was thinking about when I read your reply and responded. Before I took this job, I lived a pretty segregated life, but living in a predominantly African American small city in the dirty south, and working with my students every day, meeting their folks, going to their houses, maintaing relationships with them for years because they love to be cared about, for over a decade I've been learning how poverty works in this region. The injustice does disgust me and make me very angry. I won't take it out on the forum again.
i dont thing you have to apologize for anything!!
 

TheFatBastard

Well-Known Member
We have a great community here, sometimes we need to let off some steam.

Which better place than this? :science:

BTW, you know some of my personal background.... I grew up in a very poor neighborhood. Only a couple out of 30 kids from my school went to high school and have some college education. I remember some of my summer friends (I use to spend the holydays at my grandma's house, in a fishermen town, I come from a long tradition of fishermen, both of my grandpas were fisherman and I'm the first generation that doesn't make a life out of it) didn't want to come to my birthdays because they were scared of coming to my neighborhood :freak:

I know what poverty is. Really. I was lucky because I've never been hungry or have real needs.....but I also know that some people are born more fortunate than others. And I really think that the only way to get people out of poverty is education.
 

GetLeft

Well-Known Member
once the thread is started...

Not sure why a new thread is needed. Folks who are enoying this meandering conversation know where to find it. But if the conversation moves, please leave some sort of note here so I can find it when I come back. :)

These are the threads that keep me checking into FC. I enjoy reading folks' differences of opinion and I respect people being able to express them without others get themselves overly upset when someone says something they don't like. Tolerance is a good thing. Goes hand in hand with freedom of speech.
 

PapaEmeritusCDXX

Microtonal Banana
"These are the threads that keep me checking into FC. I enjoy reading folks' differences of opinion and I respect people being able to express them without others get themselves overly upset when someone says something they don't like. Tolerance is a good thing. Goes hand in hand with freedom of speech."

Agree 110%. We all have our differences, beliefs and reasonings as to why, but what's the point if most people can't respect them? Too much hostility, too little sitting down like adults and actually discussing without yelling, name calling, the whole 9. Nobody wants to talk, they just wanna shoot, take you out, etc just to prove a point for some BS form of superiority.

You won't change minds overnight, that's for sure. There's expressing your beliefs like a person, and there's being a complete fuckwit who just wants to be right 100% of the time with NO compromise.

Just personal musings, don't mind the shadow who lurks in the corners of the room.
 

daoist

Well-Known Member
i started vaping in my early 40's. vaping daily makes me feel a more complete person. I have been depressed and negative almost all my life. And now the vape changes this for the better. I don't have kids. And i probably would have never started vaping if i had any kids.

You just should vape as an addition to your life to deal with stress etc. Vaping should never become a goal on its own.
Each person finds it's own balance in this. But vaping daily is not so harmful. If you drink every day that would cause more damage.
For me vaping daily makes me feel more balanced and have a more positive and elevated mood. Even the next day when i am not high. So for me this is a self medicated solution.

I am a Sativa guy myself, but each person has different needs. Sometimes when i get hybrid sativas i take some cbd capsules to get a bit more of an energetic sativa high because the sativa hybrids are basicly just couch lockers. So i just add some extra sativa by adding a cbd capsule so i feel less drowsy. Sometimes it is hard to get full sativas.

The weird thing about weed is that it also sort of fixes my bad motor skills. Normally if i toss a fryng pan or wok with food it flies all over the kitchen.
When i am high i can suddenly do it. So whatever it does, it does something for the better.

I grew up my parents told me to never ever use drugs. But that was just more scare tactics without them doing any reading up on it or anything. They think all the drugs are the same. When you are in your 30's or 40's you should be you, how you want to be. stay true to yourself. Don't live your life how others tell you to live your life, live your life how you think you should live it and try to be a good person in general while doing that.
 
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abcd5432

Well-Known Member
The more I learned the more I realized we were just lied to growing up. Lol we drink actual poison that can kill ourselves yet that wasn't stigmatized nearly as bad. And things will change in the future as to opinions.

But for me it's just been better than the alternatives I've seen of actual pharmacy drugs(look what happened there...) or alcohol. So really, people can think what they want.

Vaping, I love because it's efficient and effective. You could smoke... But that's less efficient, hurts more (for me) and costs way more (bye bye 66% of the product to combustion. So I can only vape a literal amount, able to be calculated, of Marijuana a year.

A purely defined thing I can do that is relaxing ...

A small amount of money invested covers the whole thing... How could I dislike...

Different strains for different needs. There's just too much.

100 years from now people will look back and realize "woah... Those people were backward" just like we always do.

There's really just too much too articulate. The idea that Marijuana should be associated with a stoner teenager flunky should die.
 

Gozer

710 snob
I have enjoyed a long relationship with cannabis, from ripping hits off ceramic bongs in the seventies at the age of fifteen, to stealth vaping at work at an airline job I've held for thirty two years.
I come from a generation that worked hard and partied hard, alchohol and substance abuse have been rampant in my industry for ages.
Some friends have hit the wall, or otherwise, crashed and burned along the way. I'm an idiot for risking my job and pension if I'm caught "dirty", but I accept that risk everyday. My job is about mitigating accidents and a good sativa can keep me very focused.
That being said, I find myself working the ramp at a major airport about a hundred miles from my home where I support my wife and daughter, two adult stepsons, three dogs and a parrot.
Life is good, but these are very strange, almost surreal times we live in.

As a 710 snob, distillates are essential to maintain sanity and health. I have nine more years to go before retirement at the age of sixty-seven.

After all these decades of suffering the stink and stigma of being seen as a pothead, stoner, or dope, I can truly appreciate the great strides cannabis advocates have made in changing the culture.
Never has it been easier to achieve and maintain "inner peace" than with the potent and convenient products in the current cannabis industry.
 
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BHOMG

Well-Known Member
Many interesting points made so far. I also vape pretty much every day in "adult life" lately. After twenty+ years of using flower and dabbing, you're well aware of how different strains and forms work for you, and can use that to your advantage. Can be very helpful to vape day-to-day "adult life," whether you're looking to wake up & focus or shut off your brain for sleep. Vaping also draws less attention. No shame in it!
 
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