Vaping in "adult life"

EverythingsHazy

Well-Known Member
There are a few things to consider, in regard to the whole "do something you love" concept:

1. Money doesn't always buy happiness, but up until a certain point, it can.

This is the point where someone is financially secure. Not having to worry about food/water, shelter, healthcare, debt, etc., helps increase happiness levels.
"Money really can buy happiness, as it turns out — but you might not need as much as you think.

A large analysis published in the journal Nature Human Behavior used data from the Gallup World Poll, a survey of more than 1.7 million people from 164 countries, to put a price on optimal emotional well-being: between $60,000 and $75,000 a year. That aligns with past research on the topic, which found that people are happiest when they make about $75,000 a year.

But while that may be the sweet spot for feeling positive emotions on a day-to-day basis, the researchers found that a higher figure — $95,000 — is ideal for “life evaluation,” which takes into account long-term goals, peer comparisons and other macro-level metrics...

All told, the ideal income for life evaluation ranged from $35,000 in Latin America to $125,000 in Australia and New Zealand.

In North America, the optimal amount for life evaluation was estimated at $105,000, and the range for emotional well-being was slated at $65,000 to $95,000..."
2. Not all passions/hobbies are equally feasible as career options.

If you are passionate about computer programming, you can probably do what you love, and make a ton of money. If you are passionate about making fishing flies by hand, or knitting scarves, you're gonna have to do a ton of manual labor to support a family of 3+.

There are always exceptions, but going against the odds, without a backup plan, is very risky.

3. What kind of lifestyle do you want?

Different lifestyles require different incomes.

If you want to live in a small, country cabin, and spend most of your time at home, you might not need that much money. Being a local trinket maker might be a viable option.

If you want to live in NYC or LA, or any other big city, and you want to travel the world, and have a nice car, and a big house, you'd be foolish to go down that road.
 

MegaMan2k

Well-Known Member
I think it boils down to the simple facts of do you have kids and do you have a demanding job and also a relationship to tend to, and there for not so much age. I know plenty of people in there 20s with these same challenges.

The way i see it if you wanna live a "canna" life you need to plan your relationships etc according
for example with a partner that also understands the herb and preferably vape/smokes it aswell- a work place that accepts it and so on.
 

TheFatBastard

Well-Known Member
I think it boils down to the simple facts of do you have kids and do you have a demanding job and also a relationship to tend to, and there for not so much age. I know plenty of people in there 20s with these same challenges.

The way i see it if you wanna live a "canna" life you need to plan your relationships etc according
for example with a partner that also understands the herb and preferably vape/smokes it aswell- a work place that accepts it and so on.

Yeah, agree, the only thing is that, as of today, people in their 20's do not use to have kids, I mean, at least here in Spain. Today, in my social enviroment, people tends to become "adults" (wife, kids, mortgage, etc....) around 35 yeas old....but it is not just a matter of age, is also because people in our 40's now usually grew up with the "cannabis is a very bad drug" stigma, remember Reagan in the 80's......Cannabis has been a more accessible drug, less stigmatized since the late 90's .

Anyway, I agree with you.

My wife, as I say, have tried Cannabis and vaps with me from time to time. Not an enthusiast, but she likes it ocassionally. But she is concerned about our kids discovering that I use cannabis in a regular way, discover my plants, etc. Told her that I will explain my kids what cannabis is and how it should be used in my oppinion, they are smart kids, I'm sure they will handle the drugs issue better if they have information instead of mebnaces.
 

endof3d

WWG1 WGA
This is a really enjoyable thread with many honest and thoughtful contributions from individuals of all ages. Been a while now, but do remember the guilt having to sneak outside to avoid having my kid/wife seeing me use. Made me often question why exactly I needed to do so. The biggest attraction for me through those years was the strong, irresistible, almost hypnotic pull to cultivate it. Of all the thousands of different variety of plants I've grown and searched for in the wild over several continents, none have had the 'magical presence' as this plant possesses. Believed it then, and still believe that there is a historical bond between this plant and humans and probably other mammals.
 

YaMon

Vaping since 2010
I've seen folks chose a less lucrative career path because of their love for the work and I've seen those who chose $$$ as the primary criteria for their career path. The ones making less money can't wait to get to work and the others can't wait to get paid
I love technology and always have and am now at the pinnacle for me of technology jobs, architect. I cannot say that I am happy.

Being healthy, in my humble opinion, means we have the ability to accept the grunt work, the bureacuracy, the small minds, the problems that beset any relationship, etc., and get through it.
This is a part of our culture which is no longer pure. If you told me 30 years ago I'd be a technology architect with a major global company making what I am, but that I'd be living in a small ranch and driving a VW I would have told you 'get the fuck out of here.' Please read that as you have got to be kidding me, like no Audi, BMW or restomod? The real issue behind our local state governments, schools and other resources being in trouble is they are all underfunded. They do not have enough of a support base and we are the support base (Corporations while contributors get huge tax breaks). This is because the support base is not making enough money. Wages have not kept pace with cost of living increases over the past 20-30 years, WTF? Why? Because we've been conditioned to except it, to pull up our boot straps, to do more with less! Bullshit! How many of you have a pension or major medical (employer paid) at retirement? The Baby Boomers are the last of those with pensions and healthcare benefits (And that is only if you're a boomer who works for an employer for 20+ years that offers the same), unless you are a teacher or work for the local and state government, who by the way are blamed for tight budgets due to their generous pensions and benefits. COVID-19 is really bringing this to light as we see how many Americans are living not just beyond their means but paycheck to paycheck with little to no emergency fund. Billionaire Ray Dalio made his fortune studying historical trends and he now believes the size of the gap between the haves and have nots has grown to a dangerous point which if not addressed will lead to unrest. So Sista, it's time for the corporations and their investors to share some of their good fortune and bring wage up to where they should be, either that or you're going to see a resurgence of unions.
 
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happynomoretobacco

Well-Known Member
This is a really enjoyable thread with many honest and thoughtful contributions from individuals of all ages. Been a while now, but do remember the guilt having to sneak outside to avoid having my kid/wife seeing me use. Made me often question why exactly I needed to do so. The biggest attraction for me through those years was the strong, irresistible, almost hypnotic pull to cultivate it. Of all the thousands of different variety of plants I've grown and searched for in the wild over several continents, none have had the 'magical presence' as this plant possesses. Believed it then, and still believe that there is a historical bond between this plant and humans and probably other mammals.

I am not a bible guy but i got told the story about Noah and his arch from an old rastaman:
......the rain get stronger they wanted to start but Noah said wait we miss something - then came the dove and the dove had the green in their beak. And man this green was our ganja. Then they was complete and left...
 

GetLeft

Well-Known Member
and probably other mammals.

Our current cat follows me when he sees me heading toward the fridge in the garage to grab a beer. That beer is not always a beer. He understands. Not that that makes the thing all that high on the evolutionary ladder. Lose the dander and we'll talk.

I cannot say that I am happy.

Thanks for the affirmation. My job's been rewarding in many ways for many years. I am privileged to have it and I hope I can hold on to it for a little while yet. But it has also sucked in some meaningful ways. Yin yang stuff I guess.
 

uncanni

Well-Known Member
nd still believe that there is a historical bond between this plant and humans and probably other mammals.
Take a look at Robert Clarke's Cannabis: Evolution and Ethnohistory. Cannabis has been our best friend in the plant kingdom for around 10,000 years. She gave nomadic tribes so much: textile, rope, protein from seeds, medicine, and spiritual awakening (or whatever they called it back then).

the size of the gap between the haves and have nots has grown to a dangerous point which if not addressed will lead to unrest.
The sooner it leads to serious unrest, perhaps the better--if global warming doesn't guarantee our extinction. We long ago passed the dangerous point, and we're at the point of seriously destroying life on the planet.

the dove had the green in their beak
The Hebrews called it
Keneh bosem - Exodus 30:23 http://www.herbmuseum.ca/content/keneh-bosem-exodus-3023
 

His_Highness

In the land of the blind, the one-eyed man is king
I love technology and always have and am now at the pinnacle for me of technology jobs, architect. I cannot say that I am happy.

What people do for a living isn't the only factor in being happy. I love the work and as stated previously "would do it for a hobby if I didn't do it for a living". That love has made it possible for me to succeed where other's might not because I enjoy the work so much the deadlines, stress, long hours and assholes encountered couldn't sufficiently diminish the joy I find while doing what I love. At differing points I was forced to take on management roles and even though I was successful (that's why they kept forcing me to manage projects) I hated it. Managing multi-million dollar projects pays more but I have made it clear I'm not interested. I know how lucky I am to be able to turn down higher paying work to be happy and I know how much happier I am because of it.

Bottom line .... One third or more of our life is spent doing and thinking about what we do for a living. The other two thirds carry more weight in terms of being happy overall.
 

happynomoretobacco

Well-Known Member
Bottom line .... One third or more of our life is spent doing and thinking about what we do for a living. The other two thirds carry more weight in terms of being happy overall.

in ancient native comunitys they spent 2 hours a day for collecting and hunting - the rest of the day was for them being with their childs, playing and relax....and for sure weeding - i am not so sure if they already had vapes :shrug:
 

virtualpurple

Well-Known Member
in ancient native comunitys they spent 2 hours a day for collecting and hunting - the rest of the day was for them being with their childs, playing and relax....and for sure weeding - i am not so sure if they already had vapes :shrug:

not to be skeptical, but I’m skeptical. I am wondering which parts of the world folks were able to end a hunt within 2 hours. But I’m learning new things every day, if there is any culture you are pointing to in particular I’d love to read up on them.

I’m more familiar with cultures that had to track migrations and run down their prey to exhaustion.
 

vapirtoo

Well-Known Member
In hunter\gatherer societies the women always found more nutritious and plentiful plant based foods that actually sustained the culture.
The men brought in animals that were highly prized ,but not as nutritious or plentiful.
All hunter and gathers had more free time than modern people.
Check out the last remaining African hunter and gatherers, The Hadza, The last of the first.
Google it!
 

EverythingsHazy

Well-Known Member
In hunter\gatherer societies the women always found more nutritious and plentiful plant based foods that actually sustained the culture.
The men brought in animals that were highly prized ,but not as nutritious or plentiful.
All hunter and gathers had more free time than modern people.
Check out the last remaining African hunter and gatherers, The Hadza, The last of the first.
Google it!
Sources?

I want one without global warming and rainforest decimation.
Ah, yes.. But would you want to be low, middle, or upper class (economically), in such a world? :lol:
 
EverythingsHazy,
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uncanni

Well-Known Member
But would you want to be low, middle, or upper class (economically), in such a world?
No one wants poverty, so that's an odd question. No one wants to be part of a low or underclass. That means economic marginalization in a word.

I would never want to be upper class and have so much more (unnecessary) wealth than others. What does someone do with a billion dollars? I mean, really, what the fk can you do with it??? I'm a humanities professor; you know I ain't in it for the money.

If I lived in a world without global warming, I imagine it would be a world where fossil fuel production was terminated; I imagine a return to acting and living locally, with all your foods coming from the region where you live. No more of this shipping lettuce from California to Rhode Island or whatever. I imagine all travel being slower and diminished: people would work locally.

Without all those trucks that have become a blight on our existence on the road, all kinds of jobs would disappear and new types of work would be created, with fair and equitable salaries for everyone. We'd all drive electric cars that only go up to 50mph.

I imagine a lof of other things about this utopia of mine, but I know that by definition, a utopia is an imagining and no more. But that's the world I'd like to live in, which I guess affiliates me to Luddism and deep ecology...
 

TheFatBastard

Well-Known Member
No one wants poverty, so that's an odd question. No one wants to be part of a low or underclass. That means economic marginalization in a word.

I would never want to be upper class and have so much more (unnecessary) wealth than others. What does someone do with a billion dollars? I mean, really, what the fk can you do with it??? I'm a humanities professor; you know I ain't in it for the money.

If I lived in a world without global warming, I imagine it would be a world where fossil fuel production was terminated; I imagine a return to acting and living locally, with all your foods coming from the region where you live. No more of this shipping lettuce from California to Rhode Island or whatever. I imagine all travel being slower and diminished: people would work locally.

Without all those trucks that have become a blight on our existence on the road, all kinds of jobs would disappear and new types of work would be created, with fair and equitable salaries for everyone. We'd all drive electric cars that only go up to 50mph.

I imagine a lof of other things about this utopia of mine, but I know that by definition, a utopia is an imagining and no more. But that's the world I'd like to live in, which I guess affiliates me to Luddism and deep ecology...

That's the world I want my kids to grow up in.
 
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