Cannabis News

invertedisdead

Weapons of VAS Destruction

“San Diego has just 25 pot shops for a population of 1.4 million; San Jose has 16 stores for 1 million people.”

That’s because to get a recreational license you have to collude with a government official, and there’s not that many of them to bribe who aren’t already in an under the table deal.
 

kel

Friends & Family
You guys over there... what on earth are you doing?

Legal, not legal, can be posted, can't be posted, this is okay, this is not...

Looks to me like you are being gaslighted, something I see increasingly frequently!
 

invertedisdead

Weapons of VAS Destruction
You guys over there... what on earth are you doing?

Legal, not legal, can be posted, can't be posted, this is okay, this is not...

Looks to me like you are being gaslighted, something I see increasingly frequently!

It’s just another glaring example of economic illiteracy.

They still can’t actually explain why their prices are 3x higher than the unlicensed sellers. Just that people don’t like it and aren’t supporting it. The license thing has been a major issue in California sent Rec passed. They don’t want to hand them out and create competition.
 

TastyClouds

Well-Known Member
What a shame to see what the California market has turned into. We used to have such high quality, varied, and widely available products under the medical system and they were reasonably affordable. There was competition between growers and the rules of the land facilitated an easy path to get herb into the hands of rec users and medical patients. And most importantly, it was a big community of Cannabis enthusiasts whose main purpose was ultimately to help people get the most medicinal value out of one of earths most useful plants.

Fast forward to now and it has become a government controlled monopoly focused on extracting the most amount of money out of businesses and consumers and actively shunting the free market with unnecessary over regulation and burdens to said businesses and consumers. Ease of access, affordability, and sustainability, be damned. I am happy to see the the people taking matters into their own hands and continuing on the tradition of producing high quality medicines for our neighbors at reasonable prices.

I am all for following the law, but what the government has turned this system into is not at all what the people of California voted for or intended to become. Maybe when the folks in Sacramento actually make change to show they have our communities interests in mind, the community will return the favor. Until then, they should expect people to continue to do whats right and undercut their disingenuous asses.
 

florduh

Well-Known Member
As a concentrate consumer, I do want some level of regulation. Like, I want to know this jar of goo I just bought isn't going to kill me. But it seems like more States than not have gone way past a rational regulatory framework.

I've heard Oklahoma has a very open market. Do they have decent testing standards too, or is just the wild west? I think it's totally possible to offer patient safety while allowing customers to choose between a wide selection of dispensaries. But I don't know if anyone's cracked it yet.
 

cybrguy

Wear A Fucking Mask!

Ramahs

Fucking Combustion (mostly) Since February 2017
Yea coming from New York, im very jealous of California prices. I was in California last weekend and was able to pick up a really nice ounce for 195 with taxes included, which is a fair amount cheaper than even dealer weed of a similar quality here.

Yeah. I've been paying about $220 - $240 an oz in an illegal state.

(But I may be moving to Oregon soon!)
 

Adobewan

Well-Known Member
Our wealthy leaders don't care to hide their greed and rule as if they own cannabis. The scale will only move to legalization as their profits do.
Legalization, home growing, essentially taking cannabis off their profit docket, is a hill they seem willing to die on.
How to remove money from politics? Answer that and save the world.
From the land of the free.
 

florduh

Well-Known Member
(But I may be moving to Oregon soon!)
Fuck yeah dude! Awesome if you can swing it. There's one level of contempt your government can have for you, where they slap a 35% tax on the cannabis you have to buy at their campaign contributor's business. Then there's a whole other level of contempt, where your government will lock you in a cage just for holding it.

And I'm pretty sure Oregon is one of the better markets right now.

How to remove money from politics? Answer that and save the world.

You literally ban it and make all campaigns publicly funded. It's not a perfect solution, but keep in mind the current solution is funding campaigns with legalized bribery. I don't know why we just accept that. I'd also ban most political ads, especially anything funded by dark money. Not like they're educating anyone anyway.

None of that is going to happen of course. Because of money in politics. So it's a Catch-22 situation.
 

Vaporware

Well-Known Member
What a shame to see what the California market has turned into. We used to have such high quality, varied, and widely available products under the medical system and they were reasonably affordable. There was competition between growers and the rules of the land facilitated an easy path to get herb into the hands of rec users and medical patients. And most importantly, it was a big community of Cannabis enthusiasts whose main purpose was ultimately to help people get the most medicinal value out of one of earths most useful plants.

Fast forward to now and it has become a government controlled monopoly focused on extracting the most amount of money out of businesses and consumers and actively shunting the free market with unnecessary over regulation and burdens to said businesses and consumers. Ease of access, affordability, and sustainability, be damned. I am happy to see the the people taking matters into their own hands and continuing on the tradition of producing high quality medicines for our neighbors at reasonable prices.

I am all for following the law, but what the government has turned this system into is not at all what the people of California voted for or intended to become. Maybe when the folks in Sacramento actually make change to show they have our communities interests in mind, the community will return the favor. Until then, they should expect people to continue to do whats right and undercut their disingenuous asses.

I think your analysis is missing a couple of important things:

1. Legalization across the country has been sold to people not as an issue of personal freedom and bodily autonomy, but as a way to control the market and profit off of cannabis users (usually to fund things that *should* already have been well funded).

That makes it easy to set high taxes and keep raising them, and makes it harder for people to sympathize with the businesses that are struggling under the systems we’ve set up.

I think it’s also important to recognize that there are bad actors out there who are completely willing to sell low quality or even unsafe products, so I think a fair amount (but not all) of the regulations are reasonable.

2. Across the country our governments are controlled by the wealthy and big business. You can see in basically everything they do (anything that we haven’t managed to force on them) that they will happily hurt the poor/middle class and small businesses to benefit the people and businesses they do care about.

Until we stop allowing those people to buy the large majority of our politicians, it’s not likely to get better, but the root of the problem is not government itself as much as the people in control of it and the people who control them.
 

florduh

Well-Known Member
I think your analysis is missing a couple of important things:

1. Legalization across the country has been sold to people not as an issue of personal freedom and bodily autonomy, but as a way to control the market and profit off of cannabis users (usually to fund things that *should* already have been well funded).

That makes it easy to set high taxes and keep raising them, and makes it harder for people to sympathize with the businesses that are struggling under the systems we’ve set up.

I think it’s also important to recognize that there are bad actors out there who are completely willing to sell low quality or even unsafe products, so I think a fair amount (but not all) of the regulations are reasonable.

2. Across the country our governments are controlled by the wealthy and big business. You can see in basically everything they do (anything that we haven’t managed to force on them) that they will happily hurt the poor/middle class and small businesses to benefit the people and businesses they do care about.

Until we stop allowing those people to buy the large majority of our politicians, it’s not likely to get better, but the root of the problem is not government itself as much as the people in control of it and the people who control them.

I agree with all of that. It is kind of nuts that almost every legalization initiative sells itself as a revenue collection scheme. I'm sorry, but if a State needs money, I know where they can go get it. And it's not from cannabis consumers.

In my opinion, cannabis should be taxed at the normal sales tax rate. The only valid reason I can see for slightly higher taxes is if it's truly necessary to fund lab testing and ensuring clean/healthy products.
 

FlyingLow

Team NO SLEEP!
My home state of Texas is definitely having issues, but the entire country could be in trouble if free and fair federal elections are a thing of the past.
So after all the investigations, recounts and dismissed lawsuits, you still think Trump won???:dog:

Its like the "You lost, get over it" crowd from 2016 is in their 11th consecutive month of not getting over loosing in 2020...





What are the next states expected to turn legal, are any close or changing this coming year??
 

JBone65

Well-Known Member
So after all the investigations, recounts and dismissed lawsuits, you still think Trump won???
I'm a fan of free and fair elections, like we had before Trump. It's the next election that might not be free and fair. It's either gonna be the end of racist Jim Crow politics or the beginning of a permanent authoritarion regime. It's looking more like the latter at the moment. Scary shit!

Hopefully the apple bonkers and blue meanies won't re-criminalize marijuana...
 

1nd3cEnt

Well-Known Member
The US cannabis industry has a “US” problem. The high cost of labor, water, electricity, possibly tariffs, and taxation on exports could make the cannabis industry look a lot like the auto industry and manufacturing. One new up-and-coming in the international cannabis scene is Colombia. The stunning numbers I saw during Luis Merchan’s presentation at Benzinga showed that his company, Flora, can grow a gram of cannabis for $0.60. The cost to grow a gram of marijuana in North America is between $1.50 and $2.35.
 

JBone65

Well-Known Member
The cost to grow a gram of marijuana in North America is between $1.50 and $2.35.
Very interesting. I'm guessing homegrown can be inexpensive or very expensive depending on the setup. For example, an outdoor grow can theoretically be free.

Looking back at the cost of a small hydroponic grow I once enjoyed, the startup cost was the big cost.

I had a modest 6-plant grow room costing around $1500-2000 at the time. From that I produced roughly 12 premium ounces every three months for about $300, maybe less.

If these figures are representative, then after 4 crops are harvested you would recover 48 ounces for a total cost of $3200, which is $2.38/g.

Of course it's a long term investment. The total cost of 8 crops, 96 ounces, would be around $4400 or $1.64/g.

After the equipment cost is paid out (or sunk), it should only cost around $300 for 12 ounces, which is $25/ounce, $0.89/g. These are probably outdated figures, but still in the ballpark hopefully.

A minor point but I would probably only grow 2 crops per year, I found that it works much better when you can easily keep the temperature below 70°, preferably around 68°, in the fall and winter. This stretches the payout out over a longer period of time. Really strong weed will stink up the entire neighborhood if you're not careful. HPS lights generate a lot of heat. I mixed HPS and LED.👍💲👺☮️

No way I'm buying Chinese weed. It's an excellent hobby. I read about some Acapulco gold seeds in another thread.....
 
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1nd3cEnt

Well-Known Member
What are the next states expected to turn legal, are any close or changing this coming year??
 

JBone65

Well-Known Member
“San Diego has just 25 pot shops for a population of 1.4 million; San Jose has 16 stores for 1 million people.”
Oklahoma only allows medical weed, but everyone qualifies and $100 buys a 2-year license. There were 2200 dispensaries for 27M people last I heard. There's a shop on every corner. Gives me a warm fuzzy feeling.

Oddly, the liquor bidness in Oklahoma is fairly corrupted, it's very hard to get a license, but the weed bidness is wide open.

The license also allows growing with up to 6 large and 6 small plants.

Prices are similar to Colorado, not too high. The top trending strains can go for $250-$275/oz, but I can usually get excellent sativa for $140-$165/oz.

I suspect it's a buyer beware market, there was a recent article about the OMMA conducting almost no inspections on dispensaries. They seem to be focused on catching large illegal grow operations.

I bought three ounces of 24% Durbin Poison last year which was probably genuine, it had incredible terpenoid flavor. Later on I bought some at a different dispensary, also supposedly 24% Durbin Poison. Looked very similar but was weaker. It would help if we could sample the products a few times before deciding. I'm guessing reputable dispensaries will provide accurate tests and charge more, etc.
 
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florduh

Well-Known Member
Oklahoma only allows medical weed, but everyone qualifies and $100 buys a 2-year license. There were 2200 dispensaries for 27M people last I heard. There's a shop on every corner. Gives me a warm fuzzy feeling.

Oddly, the liquor bidness in Oklahoma is fairly corrupted, it's very hard to get a license, but the weed bidness is wide open.

The license also allows growing with up to 6 large and 6 small plants.

Prices are similar to Colorado, not too high. The top trending strains can go for $250-$275/oz, but I can usually get excellent sativa for $140-$165/oz.

I suspect it's a buyer beware market, there was a recent article about the OMMA conducting almost no inspections on dispensaries. They seem to be focused on catching large illegal grow operations.

I bought three ounces of 24% Durbin Poison last year which was probably genuine, it had incredible terpenoid flavor. Later on I bought some at a different dispensary, also supposedly 24% Durbin Poison. Looked very similar but was weaker. It would help if we could sample the products a few times before deciding. I'm guessing reputable dispensaries will provide accurate tests and charge more, etc.
How’s the concentrate testing situation? Prop 215 in Cali saw a ton of med shops, which was awesome. But I sure inhaled a lot of mystery shatter.
 

1nd3cEnt

Well-Known Member
How does Oklahoma treat out of state? Do they honor out of state med licenses? Can visitors to the state get access/medical licenses?
Visiting Patients: Patients who can prove they are registered in another medical marijuana state with a regulated program may apply for and be issued a temporary, 30-day, medical marijuana license for a $100 fee.
 
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