The Nomad From Morwood

jds

Well-Known Member
I can clear a bowl in two hits, so basically in under a minute, with the high heater. It takes a bit of technique, but it's easier and quicker than doing the same with a vapcap.
 

SloJimFizz

Unknown Member
Nice stuff @flammy
Do you have all three of Dan's heaters?
I just got the Medium heater to complete the set, and I think it is the perfect mix out of all three.

Here's a couple pics of my Nomad II with it's muse. You'd have thunk I sent the uke up to Dan the way he nailed the tint in the finish.
The Nomads wood quality is so much higher than this uke though. An ukulele with this AAA grade would fetch $$$ fat coin.

PXL-20220602-010423357.jpg





PXL-20220602-010714694.jpg

PXL-20220602-010348081.jpg
 

Dan Morrison

Well-Known Member
Manufacturer
@SloJimFizz Woooow, that's amazing!

Your "medium" heater is actually the new high heater. What I did a while ago was to delete the old high heater from the roster, tune the experimental medium heater a bit more, and make that heater the new high heater.

So, for you, this heater would be near the middle, between your older low and older high heaters.

But for people reading your post, just know that your "medium" is actually the new high, haha.

Also, LOVE those photos, what a great combo! It's wild how similar they turned out!
 

Shit Snacks

Milaana. Lana. LANA. LANAAAAA! (TM/FW7/OAB/CC-H&A)
@SloJimFizz Woooow, that's amazing!

Your "medium" heater is actually the new high heater. What I did a while ago was to delete the old high heater from the roster, tune the experimental medium heater a bit more, and make that heater the new high heater.

So, for you, this heater would be near the middle, between your older low and older high heaters.

But for people reading your post, just know that your "medium" is actually the new high, haha.

Also, LOVE those photos, what a great combo! It's wild how similar they turned out!

Oh, great to know! I have the original old heaters from my Nomad1 but was planning to rely on new Toad heater when it arrives ;)
 

SloJimFizz

Unknown Member
@SloJimFizz Woooow, that's amazing!

Your "medium" heater is actually the new high heater. What I did a while ago was to delete the old high heater from the roster, tune the experimental medium heater a bit more, and make that heater the new high heater.

So, for you, this heater would be near the middle, between your older low and older high heaters.

But for people reading your post, just know that your "medium" is actually the new high, haha.

Also, LOVE those photos, what a great combo! It's wild how similar they turned out!
Oh crap, me spreading false info, thanks for the heater info update @Dan Morrison . This new High heater is just about perfect in heat up time and max temp hit whilst riding the button.
 

flammy

Well-Known Member
Nice stuff @flammy
Do you have all three of Dan's heaters?
I just got the Medium heater to complete the set, and I think it is the perfect mix out of all three.

Here's a couple pics of my Nomad II with it's muse. You'd have thunk I sent the uke up to Dan the way he nailed the tint in the finish.
The Nomads wood quality is so much higher than this uke though. An ukulele with this AAA grade would fetch $$$ fat coin.

PXL-20220602-010423357.jpg





PXL-20220602-010714694.jpg

PXL-20220602-010348081.jpg

Awesome pics! Thanks for sharing!

I have low and high heaters from nomad 1 which imo are lower and higher than current low/high heaters respectively. This said, the current low and high heaters imo seem to be perfectly tuned and the difference between them isn’t extreme either. I enjoy and use both low an high heaters and definitely favor them over the older generation.
 

recursive

Member
The Nomad is the one vape that doesn't need a "review" at all. Considering the microscopic number of Nomads in the wild I would say anyone who makes a Nomad YouTube video isn't doing a review, they're just showing off. :D

:peace:
Yeah I understand what you’re saying but I watch reviews mainly because I just like vapes and seeing all of the different ones if that makes sense. I simply just enjoy learning about all of the little different things about each vape

And considering a nomad is basically unobtainable for me, I enjoy learning about them and seeing people use them haha
 

xtraclipsforxtrashit

Well-Known Member
Here's a question I've been thinking to myself:

How long do you envision, reckon, think the ribbons in the heaters last for @Dan Morrison ? Heating up and cooling down all the time I would think they'd eventually get brittle and could break?

Because I'm the type that would by extra heaters just to have for years and years just incase.
 
xtraclipsforxtrashit,
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checkyourlibido

Well-Known Member
Here's a question I've been thinking to myself:

How long do you envision, reckon, think the ribbons in the heaters last for @Dan Morrison ? Heating up and cooling down all the time I would think they'd eventually get brittle and could break?

Because I'm the type that would by extra heaters just to have for years and years just incase.
I imagine these will outlive all of us. I'm thinking they are heirloom pieces.
 
checkyourlibido,

fangorn

Well-Known Member
@xtraclipsforxtrashit
it's a good question !! we would need the opinion of a first-time owner... who uses his radiator every day but he must not have many... ah but if... Dan himself 😁 (even if I imagine he updated his own stock heater!)

So far I've only used low heat...
but with two radiators, I think I have time !!

I'm not sure it's very useful here but at the time I found an interesting article (even if not deep enough) on the use of Nichrome in electronic cigarettes...
It will not bring you an answer... but the info is not bad to have!
 
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xtraclipsforxtrashit

Well-Known Member
Thank you for the article @fangorn. I completely agree with your assessment that it is interesting but not deep enough.

But it brings up a different question entirely because they say nichrome is least dangerous when new but more so when old? -- That's what I'm inferring from their use of pyrolysis but could be wrong.
And they say to change coils regularly and not dry fire them but dry firing is all we are doing with the Nomad heaters.

So the health safety of coils such as nichrome giving off micro metal fumes that are dangerous is my point BUT --

Luckily after a few quick searches I found this article, that links to a study, that says in actuality there isn't a danger to inhaling from these heating metals.


Not trying to cause FUD on Dan's heater's/devices either; it just all kind of came to mind.
 

RxPlorer

Well-Known Member
Thank you for the article @fangorn. I completely agree with your assessment that it is interesting but not deep enough.

But it brings up a different question entirely because they say nichrome is least dangerous when new but more so when old? -- That's what I'm inferring from their use of pyrolysis but could be wrong.
And they say to change coils regularly and not dry fire them but dry firing is all we are doing with the Nomad heaters.

So the health safety of coils such as nichrome giving off micro metal fumes that are dangerous is my point BUT --

Luckily after a few quick searches I found this article, that links to a study, that says in actuality there isn't a danger to inhaling from these heating metals.


Not trying to cause FUD on Dan's heater's/devices either; it just all kind of came to mind.
Really appreciate you pointing out the concerns. Health should be top of mind through every aspect
 

flammy

Well-Known Member
What's the size of this unit like? Hard to tell from pics
Recently lost my impcognito and I'm thinking about what I'm going to get to replace it, because I don't think I can get an imp again 😔

Very portable. Form factor very similar to that of the firewoods. The Nomad 2 and toad have become my primary OTG options. Both are extremely durable and have very pocket and hand friendly form factors.

I have an impcognito and personally feel like the Nomad2/Toad are better OTG options. I will try to snap a side by side with an impcognito this weekend and post.
 

simba

@weedanwine
Very portable. Form factor very similar to that of the firewoods. The Nomad 2 and toad have become my primary OTG options. Both are extremely durable and have very pocket and hand friendly form factors.

I have an impcognito and personally feel like the Nomad2/Toad are better OTG options. I will try to snap a side by side with an impcognito this weekend and post.
Very interesting! and a side-by-side pic would be great thanks :)

I don't know much about the Toad vs. the Nomad2? What do you feel make the Nomad2+Toad better OTG options than the Impcognito? The imp was practically perfect OTG for me.
 
simba,

Vaporware

Well-Known Member
Not to stir up the heating element discussion again, but I wanted to add that under normal circumstances the Nomad/Toad heaters should not be glowing much if at all. They’re made from Nichrome ribbon which has a lot more mass.

E-cig coils are made from thin wire, and at least dry firing would probably make them glow. That might even be normal like it is with a few other dry herb vaporizers. I think when you get it hot enough to glow is when you’re really risking degradation. Any heater could fail at some point, but I don’t see any reason these shouldn’t have very long lives.

If Dan ever stops making heaters I hope he’ll list the exact specifications so someone else can make replacements, but I think he’ll be willing and able to make them if we need them for a long time to come. :)

So far the only heaters I’ve heard of anyone replacing were either newer versions or a couple that had a soldering issue and failed early. I’m sure that issue has been resolved and I haven’t heard of any heater problems since then.
 

xtraclipsforxtrashit

Well-Known Member
Not to stir up the heating element discussion again, but I wanted to add that under normal circumstances the Nomad/Toad heaters should not be glowing much if at all. They’re made from Nichrome ribbon which has a lot more mass.

E-cig coils are made from thin wire, and at least dry firing would probably make them glow. That might even be normal like it is with a few other dry herb vaporizers. I think when you get it hot enough to glow is when you’re really risking degradation. Any heater could fail at some point, but I don’t see any reason these shouldn’t have very long lives.

If Dan ever stops making heaters I hope he’ll list the exact specifications so someone else can make replacements, but I think he’ll be willing and able to make them if we need them for a long time to come. :)

So far the only heaters I’ve heard of anyone replacing were either newer versions or a couple that had a soldering issue and failed early. I’m sure that issue has been resolved and I haven’t heard of any heater problems since then.
Good points about them mainly most likely not getting red hot all the time.
 
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jds

Well-Known Member
Nichrome ribbon is extremely durable. They can be heated red hot (more specifically 900 C+, which is beyond red hot) over and over for at least 10 000 cycles from what I've gathered through a little research. I doubt the heaters in the Nomad get that hot regularly, so they will most likely last for way more heat cycles.
 

flammy

Well-Known Member
Very interesting! and a side-by-side pic would be great thanks :)

I don't know much about the Toad vs. the Nomad2? What do you feel make the Nomad2+Toad better OTG options than the Impcognito? The imp was practically perfect OTG for me.

Here are some side by side pics against my impcognito paired with an aster rt sbs mod which is arguably the most compact way to use the impcognito. The nomad 2 is slightly taller but that’s a fair trade off for having a longer airpath compared to impcognito which makes which the vapor cooler than impcognito. Another reason why I prefer the nomad 2 vs impcognito as my otg option is that the impcognito wiht mod is much heavier than nomad 2. It’s also a bit bulkier which is more inconvenient than being taller from a pocketability standpoint. As you can see from the pics, the nomad 2 is very small.

 

simba

@weedanwine
Here are some side by side pics against my impcognito paired with an aster rt sbs mod which is arguably the most compact way to use the impcognito. The nomad 2 is slightly taller but that’s a fair trade off for having a longer airpath compared to impcognito which makes which the vapor cooler than impcognito. Another reason why I prefer the nomad 2 vs impcognito as my otg option is that the impcognito wiht mod is much heavier than nomad 2. It’s also a bit bulkier which is more inconvenient than being taller from a pocketability standpoint. As you can see from the pics, the nomad 2 is very small.
Much appreciation for the pic and explanation, well guess that means I need to get on the wait list then 🤣
 

KeroZen

Chronic vapaholic
But it brings up a different question entirely because they say nichrome is least dangerous when new but more so when old? -- That's what I'm inferring from their use of pyrolysis but could be wrong. And they say to change coils regularly and not dry fire them but dry firing is all we are doing with the Nomad heaters.

Pyrolysis can only happen when there's organic matter to burn (or well...pyrolyse as it's a not a combustion). In e-cigs, coils are in direct and permanent contact with cotton and e-liquid. Coils get all crusty over time because the wicking effect of the cotton is not perfect, so some of the liquid overcooks and some of the cotton also "burns". This create after a while a black crust layer around the coils. Some people then dry fire them super hot to try to remove the crap but this is where you risk ending up in excessive oxidation territory, so it's not good either.

In our application there's only air and some plant powder falling through the bowl mesh. The former does not interact (apart from oxidation) and the latter is minimal enough to not cause any major concern. Brushing your heater from time to time can't hurt either.

Dry-firing in e-cig lingo (or getting "a dry hit") happens when there's not enough liquid and the tank and cotton dry down. At this point, provided you have no protection, you basically begin to vape (then smoke) your cotton, so it's not good and must be avoided. But there's also another way the term is used, for those who build their own coils, and this is when after completing a new build you run your coils dry and make them glow on purpose, in order to see if they light up uniformly and evenly (even more so when you have multiple coils in parallel, you don't want one getting hotter than the other(s)) So there's an elaborate process, where you strum them gently etc.

So here again, and like with all our metal-based dry herb heaters, you want to avoid glowing too high and for too long (and with Titanium you can't even afford to glow as it ignites explosively, hence why it should be used exclusively in TC mode) With SS you can determine how hot the coil went by looking at its color (can get all the rainbow colors and then some) Don't know about Nichrome but it's probably similar, with a temperature vs color chart to match.

Note that creating an oxide layer can be beneficial, like for instance to help prevent self-shorts, and I believe Dan exposes his heaters to a high temperature at some point to stabilize them (annealing process) and he might also create that oxide layer on purpose IIRC. There was some concern with the creation of certain Chromium oxides, but it's unclear whether they really can form under these conditions, and if they do how easily they can flake off the heater afterwards.

Note also that eating stuff prepared with stainless steel cookware exposes you already to a daily dose of Nickel, Chromium and Iron, but it's all in perfectly safe concentrations. Like explained in the linked articles above, it's the dose that makes the poison.

paired with an aster rt sbs mod which is arguably the most compact way to use the impcognito

I believe the Dovpo College DNA 60 is even more compact. But we're completely off-topic.
 
Last edited:

xtraclipsforxtrashit

Well-Known Member
Pyrolysis can only happen when there's organic matter to burn (or well...pyrolyse as it's a not a combustion). In e-cigs, coils are in direct and permanent contact with cotton and e-liquid. Coils get all crusty over time because the wicking effect of the cotton is not perfect, so some of the liquid overcooks and some of the cotton also "burns". This create after a while a black crust layer around the coils. Some people then dry fire them super hot to try to remove the crap but this is where you risk ending up in excessive oxidation territory, so it's not good either.

In our application there's only air and some plant powder falling through the bowl mesh. The former does not interact (apart from oxidation) and the latter is minimal enough to not cause any major concern. Brushing your heater from time to time can't hurt either.

Dry-firing in e-cig lingo (or getting "a dry hit") happens when there's not enough liquid and the tank and cotton dry down. At this point, provided you have no protection, you basically begin to vape (then smoke) your cotton, so it's not good and must be avoided. But there's also another way the term is used, for those who build their own coils, and this is when after completing a new build you run your coils dry and make them glow on purpose, in order to see if they light up uniformly and evenly (even more so when you have multiple coils in parallel, you don't want one getting hotter than the other(s)) So there's an elaborate process, where you strum them gently etc.

So here again, and like with all our metal-based dry herb heaters, you want to avoid glowing too high and for too long (and with Titanium you can't even afford to glow as it ignites explosively, hence why it should be used exclusively in TC mode) With SS you can determine how hot the coil went by looking at its color (can get all the rainbow colors and then some) Don't know about Nichrome but it's probably similar, with a temperature vs color chart to match.

Note that creating an oxide layer can be beneficial, like for instance to help prevent self-shorts, and I believe Dan exposes his heaters to a high temperature at some point to stabilize them (annealing process) and he might also create that oxide layer on purpose IIRC. There was some concern with the creation of certain Chromium oxides, but it's unclear whether they really can form under these conditions, and if they do how easily they can flake off the heater afterwards.

Note also that eating stuff prepared with stainless steel cookware exposes you already to a daily dose of Nickel, Chromium and Iron, but it's all in perfectly safe concentrations. Like explained in the linked articles above, it's the dose that makes the poison.



I believe the Dovpo College DNA 60 is even more compact. But we're completely off-topic.
NICE explanation, thanks, great info!
 
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