The Nomad From Morwood

madhockeydad

Art is beauty
I don't even know anything about it yet haha. I'm trying to learn without needing to read the whole thread, I can't do that now, aggravates muscles in my hand I have to rest.

I don't even know how much it cost.

Didn't want to just ask him a ton of questions if it was all available somewhere
He has an email with most if not all the details. Contact him and he will send it to you. It includes prices and options.
David
 

Dan Morrison

Well-Known Member
Manufacturer
Here's some new shots of this cocobolo and canarywood Nomad II.

This finish is made by hand sanding up to 1500x, then applying a coat of mineral oil, and then buffing with higher grits beyond 1500x. This is just the natural beauty of the wood showing. Because there is no "finish" to dull or yellow over time, the wood surface can easily be maintained with a light, neutral oil like mineral/lemon. Because of the natural resin/wax content of cocobolo, the wood is well protected straight from the tree.

DSCF2618.jpgDSCF2620.jpgDSCF2629.jpgDSCF2635.jpgDSCF2667.jpgDSCF2666.jpgDSCF2660.jpgDSCF2659.jpgDSCF2649.jpgDSCF2650.jpg
 

Xclerk

The Universe is our endless supply
Do you mean glimmer like the little sparkles (mica) in black limba or the chatoyancy of the wood? The buttons are what really took me time. I only knew about Lichen or Opal going in and I ended up with something totally different. The button can blend in or bring a pop of color if you want it too.
Yes I was refering to the mica. I know its very prevalent in black limba. But in the curly maple its like fine sparkles like in a high end metallic paint job. Ive tried a bunch of times to photograph it but I would need a new camera lights and stuff to ever do it justice.

😍😍😍Oh that Amboyna burl and cocobolo is so sexy. Its like those pieces of wood were meant to be put together to make that exact unit. Even that button looks like it was born for it. Was this really hand made or did it just sprout out the ground looking like a piece of nature's candy. These new ones blow me away everytime. Everyone so unique and so crazy how texture plays it role in each. Deep grains. Some smooth like glass.Light or heavy. Soft dense or hard. Some delicate like porcelain or soap. I'm like these gotta be CGI or something. Dont even get me started on buttons and now opals are in the mix too.
 
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namasteIII

Well-Known Member
Any tips for getting a more even vape on the high heater?

I feel like I’m wasting the herb on the outer green and yellow ring. But stirring this vape is a pain especially for the 1 mediocre hit it results in.

Please let me know if you’re getting fully even vaping with the high heater, and how.

Thanks.


Edit: Damn the FC attach photo never works.
Here is photo of bowl.

 

Xclerk

The Universe is our endless supply
Do you not have the briar burl rings? They def help keep things more even but st the cost of some bowl size. I cant wait to try the new chambers.I tend to use the high heater through water or pulse heat till I feel the draw resistance change some
 
Xclerk,

namasteIII

Well-Known Member
I have the chambers but for me they get really loose after a session and become fiddly. So I’ve been tending to prefer just the metal screen because it stays put and is easier to handle.

I hold till it gets hot / feel resistance then pulse.

Are you pulsing from the very start?
 
namasteIII,
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Xclerk

The Universe is our endless supply
I have the chambers but for me they get really loose after a session and become fiddly. So I’ve been tending to prefer just the metal screen because it stays put and is easier to handle.

I hold till it gets hot / feel resistance then pulse.

Are you pulsing from the very start?
I hold it for like 3 seconds before pulsing. After the initial warm up only pulse. I do notice once I have a base char its easier lol. It gets hot fast on a fresh batt. I guess its really just practice. Rotating the stem occasionally helps. You can try faster shorter draws. Maybe I got lucky and mine stay snug. I do especially like the rings in a mistvape cooling stem w just the upper screen. It holds well in there and cools nice for the high heater. And it looks really cool The low is a little slow to get hot but I never over heat w it.

@No-Wrinkle cant wait till you see the curly maple in person. It's beautiful. It sparkles and feels so soft in the hand like a piece of porcelain.
 
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VaporWare

Well-Known Member
Edit: Looks like these first two paragraphs don’t apply here, although they do apply for people getting dark rings with high temp FlowerPot hits. Different heater though, so glad to know! :)

I don’t have mine yet, but with other convection heaters like the FlowerPot hot spots are often *caused* in part by a faster draw. I know with the high heater in this situation you don’t want a super slow draw, but my guess is that pulsing with a slower draw should be preferable to a fast draw.

If there’s something I’m missing here and faster is better though, someone please say so!


Also, when pulsing try to make sure that the button is being fully pressed in each time to prevent arcing between the button and back plate that could cause you to need to open it up and clean the contacts. Is this post still pretty accurate, @Dan Morrison ?

Hot Button Back Plate

I have had two reports of a poor connection in the button. Because the amps are relatively high, and the volts are low, the button contact will arc if the button is not fully depressed.

As everyone gets used to the button pressure, it's likely to press the button too light. The problem is that if this is done over and over.. the tarnish that is caused by the arcing will cause greater and greater resistance.

When that happens, the resistance will cause the back plate to become instantly very hot, from the poor connection.

If that happens, the button should be cleaned before further use. The problem will only get worse.

With my own Nomad, I tested the button by very lightly pressing the button so that I intentionally feathered it between being barely connected.. and not connected. This feathering action caused arcing and the back plate heated up.

In my normal use over the last year, I have not experienced this. It was only until I consciously tried to make it happen that it happened.

For now I recommend:

Press the button down fully, let it go quickly. Clean contact if the back plate ever gets hot. In my personal experience, I clean the button contact twice yearly.

___________

I am working on a permanent solution for the first batchers.

I applied a thin coating of Vaseline to the contact surfaces. This cured the issue. I was not able to reproduce the arcing issue or heating up back plate, no matter how hard I tried.

BUT, I am still testing this method, I do not recommend it yet. I am going to look into this further to make an official recommendation.

I need to do further resistance testing to make sure the vaseline is not introducing any resistance to the over-all circuit. Or causing any unknown adverse effects. If so, I will be looking at more purpose made conductive lubricants designed for electrical contacts.. they're designed to solve this exact same arcing issue.

I wouldn’t worry too much though. He said it only ever happened to him when he was testing and trying to make it happen, but it’s good info to have anyway in case someone reading this looks at the pulsing as a partial button press or something. :)

Edit: Oh yeah, and on the chamber thing, if it’s the new type that fits on/in the end of the stem, Dan mentioned earlier that they worked best with wooden stems since the tolerances on the glass stems are too wide to get a good friction fit on every one.

If you have a wooden stem or multiple glass stems, they might work better with a different stem!
 
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Dan Morrison

Well-Known Member
Manufacturer
Any tips for getting a more even vape on the high heater?

I've been working on a new write up for the high heater, and I've been using it a lot to get a better feel for it.

The central hot spot is a symptom of overheating for sure. And as you mentioned the bowl is pretty much spent at that point, not my idea of a good session at all!

Could be a result of two things. Inhale speed too slow, or button kept ON for too long.

Method 1: Use inhale speed alone to control the heat. This requires a very fast inhale speed, and this will increase the likelihood of central hot spotting.

Method 2: Probably the better of the two, use both inhale speed AND feathering the button.

A session with this method might go like this:

First Hit: Button ON..1...2....3....4....(start inhale, slow/med. speed)...5...6...7....8....9...button off...10....button on....11...button off....and so on.

Second Hit: Button ON...1...2...(start inhale, slow/med. speed)...3...4...button off...5....button on....6....button off....7....button on.....and so on.

If you feel like you need more heat, or it doesn't feel like the vapor is flowing as thick as you want, increase the ON time of the button, so you might toggle it off every 3 seconds, instead of every 1 second.

Sometimes I'll ramp up the heat throughout the same hit by first toggling the button on and off every second, and then slowly increasing the time between toggles around the 10-15 second mark... this seems to give a better "feel" for how things are going... and you can adjust on the fly. It's cool because you can start the hit at a lower temp, then ramp up the temp in the same hit. This is usually how I do the last hit of a session.

I'd be interesting to hear others experienced with the high heater as well.

As @VaporWare mentioned, feathering the button very softly will essentially create tiny arcs at the contact zone because of the button barely making contact, so avoid it if possible. But I wouldn't worry about it, you'll do no damage either way. And if you are creating a bad arc, you'll know immediately by the back plate heating up quickly. This is much less likely with the new button improvements since the first batches.

____

I've been thinking that there may be a need for a Medium heater in the line-up, thoughts?
 
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Copacetic

Somewhere North of The Wall
I've been working on a new write up for the high heater, and I've been using it a lot to get a better feel for it.

The central hot spot is a symptom of overheating for sure. And as you mentioned the bowl is pretty much spent at that point, not my idea of a good session at all!

Could be a result of two things. Inhale speed too slow, or button kept ON for too long.

Method 1: Use inhale speed alone to control the heat. This requires a very fast inhale speed, and this will increase the likelihood of central hot spotting.

Method 2: Probably the better of the two, use both inhale speed AND feathering the button.

A session with this method might go like this:

First Hit: Button ON..1...2....3....4....(start inhale, slow/med. speed)...5...6...7....8....9...button off...10....button on....11...button off....and so on.

Second Hit: Button ON...1...2...(start inhale, slow/med. speed)...3...4...button off...5....button on....6....button off....7....button on.....and so on.

If you feel like you need more heat, or it doesn't feel like the vapor is flowing as thick as you want, increase the ON time of the button, so you might toggle it off every 3 seconds, instead of every 1 second.

Sometimes I'll ramp up the heat throughout the same hit by first toggling the button on and off every second, and then slowly increasing the time between toggles around the 10-15 second mark... this seems to give a better "feel" for how things are going... and you can adjust on the fly. It's cool because you can start the hit at a lower temp, then ramp up the temp in the same hit. This is usually how I do the last hit of a session.

I'd be interesting to hear others experienced with the high heater as well.

As @VaporWare mentioned, feathering the button very softly will essentially create tiny arcs at the contact zone because of the button barely making contact, so avoid it if possible. But I wouldn't worry about it, you'll do no damage either way. And if you are creating a bad arc, you'll know immediately by the back plate heating up quickly. This is much less likely with the new button improvements since the first batches.

____

I've been thinking that there may be a need for a Medium heater in the line-up, thoughts?
Yeah, none of the heaters have given me any trouble, but the hot one does require a little bit of attention.
The medium you gave me is the one I use all the time.
I like quite big dense hits, but want to enjoy both the intensity of flavour and avoid the 'too toasty' end of the spectrum as well. The medium heater allows me to pre-heat for only one or two seconds, take what I consider a medium, comfortable/natural speed draw for 10-15 seconds and get a good hit with a balance of flavour and density (I simply go by mouth feel and flavour, and cease draw and button press at the same time, unless it's feeling like a hot hit, then I feather the button to taste for the last half/ few seconds of the draw).
It's a shame that we don't have a clearer way of communicating/describing draw speed, as one persons idea of 'medium' draw speed could well be completely different to anothers.
I think video of air being pulled through a bubbler or bong is probably the best existing method, but even that depends to a great extent on folk having the same bubblers.
Some sort of cheap anemometer might work: Anemometer , but given the huuuge disparity in prices for these devices, I wonder how accurate the cheap ones could be? There's also the questions of how to attach a mouthpiece, and how comparable results would be in general. Not to mention the matter of trying to explain to folks that buying an anemometer just to get a clear idea of relative draw speeds would be worthwhile!:rolleyes:
I do think draw speed is the key though, but our efforts to describe technique sometimes seem to result in 'overthink' and results no better than before advice is sought (I've seen this with SO many different vapes here on FC over the years).

How about a simple piece of hard plastic tube 3-4" in length, with a slot cut in it (across the tube) to accommodate a 'reed' which blocks the airflow until a certain draw force is applied.
A handful of reeds of different thickness could provide examples of different draw strengths, so we have a common language when discussing draw speed/strength. A simple thing like this could be easily cleaned to safely pass it on to another vaper once we have an idea of how draws #1 through 5 feel.
This arrangement could perhaps be made cheaply enough that vape retailers might see it as a worthwhile giveaway with vapes (especially manual ones). I'm picturing a 'draw strength meter' branded with Puffitup, Vapefiend or whoever.
Sorry, WAY off topic now, more 'overthink' :science: I can't even claim it's a high-dea, as all I've had for months is cbd herb.
 

KeroZen

Chronic vapaholic
You might also try the OG double screens in stem method, as the added mass and air restriction change the thermodynamics somewhat.

But we need to keep in mind that our stems work basically like a water pipe, and that fluid dynamics predict exactly what we experience. The subject is complex and since a few pictures are worth a thousand words, here's a couple for good measure:







Basically, what we want ideally is a turbulent flow, to introduce some mixing (not show in the above), having the load close to the "entrance" (provided the prior part is of larger diameter), and also the pipe roughness has an impact (cf. slip layer)... it gets hairy pretty fast.

It's also unclear what we can do in practice to minimize the problem. Apparently having the exposed stem part rough (ex: frosted/ground) could help somewhat but if there's exposed stem then it means the load is already far from the entrance so it's counter productive (and probably not worth risking having left-over glass particles from the grinding process get in our air flow, a topic of discussion that pops up from time to time with GonG users)

Some tried deflector (steel) plates, either right after the heater output or after the bowl (welded plate on the screen mesh) but to me it remains pretty unclear whether that really works or not.

Until then, changing draw speed and/or material compaction amount seem to be the most effective and easy to achieve way to minimize center hot-spotting.
 

Dan Morrison

Well-Known Member
Manufacturer
@KeroZen , thanks for posting those! And indeed it gets complicated quickly.

I have recently been sending out all Nomads with a double layer mesh diffuser screen permanently installed just above the heater. I feel like this helps to produce more turbulent flow, I noticed a pretty big difference.

Velocity plays a role as well, it seems like the higher the velocity, the higher the tendancy for air flow to concentrate in the center.

I think that in 100% convection devices, there is likely an optimal velocity, above which will result in too much air flow through the center of the load. Though, I think it's quite complicated since there are other factors at play such as herb load, grind consistency, chamber geometry, and air path geometry... and likely other factors as well.
 

namasteIII

Well-Known Member
Thanks everyone.

I think the super wide open airflow on the nomad actually gives me trouble. I guess because there is no feeling of resistance until you feel the vapor thickening up for me it's sometimes hard to even know what draw speed I am using. Sometimes I can't even tell if I am really drawing or if I am just sitting with this tube in my mouth. I think I'll experiment with faster draws but lots of times I feel like I need the slow draw to build up heat, or the inverse, I feel if I draw to fast I will take to much heat away from the heater get little vapor as a result.

I have mainly been trying for a consistent draw speed so that I don't have to ramp up my speed when I feel a lot of heat. Because I think doing that causes center hot spotting. However for the big hits I am going for I need to get it pretty hot.

Yeah this stuff is sort of pointless to talk about nobody knows what anyone else means when they say slow, medium, fast. I think that is an excellent point as well as the thing about overthinking.

I could try following Dans times above but with all the different factors of herb / how you pack / screen or capsule / battery level / draw speed / and more, it's better to follow it as an idea or a guide then straight up counting the seconds.

Dan and I were talking about a training wheel attachment that sits over the air intake hole and whistles at the proper draw speed. Seems like a good solution.

I know many of you think this is one of the easiest full convection instant on portables to use. I wonder if those people are getting more even extraction then me or are just not bothered by the wasted 10%

I think its just a different stokes kind of thing. Some people probably love the fully open airflow and have no trouble finding the right draw speed.

I think for me that is my biggest issue, perhaps it's something like without resistance to measure my draw speed against I'm kind of just all over the place. I think I would maybe enjoy a restrictor disk accessory, something to partially cover the air intake and add some resistance. Unless you can draw full force and not over power the heater maybe the device shouldn't have fully open airflow, and I don't think many portables have that kind of infinite power and heat calories. But I think I am in the minority on that opinion, I think lots of people enjoy the feeling of wide open airflow, even if they can't draw full force.


Well some interesting stuff you all said but since I'm 90% of the way there that 10% isn't really going to come from words or reading, the only think I can do is to play with my draw speed and button toggles more.

Thanks for the discussion, definitely gave me some hints for how to play and experiment next session.
 

Mr. Me2

Well-Known Member
Thanks everyone.

I think the super wide open airflow on the nomad actually gives me trouble. I guess because there is no feeling of resistance until you feel the vapor thickening up for me it's sometimes hard to even know what draw speed I am using. Sometimes I can't even tell if I am really drawing or if I am just sitting with this tube in my mouth. I think I'll experiment with faster draws but lots of times I feel like I need the slow draw to build up heat, or the inverse, I feel if I draw to fast I will take to much heat away from the heater get little vapor as a result.

I have mainly been trying for a consistent draw speed so that I don't have to ramp up my speed when I feel a lot of heat. Because I think doing that causes center hot spotting. However for the big hits I am going for I need to get it pretty hot.

Yeah this stuff is sort of pointless to talk about nobody knows what anyone else means when they say slow, medium, fast. I think that is an excellent point as well as the thing about overthinking.

I could try following Dans times above but with all the different factors of herb / how you pack / screen or capsule / battery level / draw speed / and more, it's better to follow it as an idea or a guide then straight up counting the seconds.

Dan and I were talking about a training wheel attachment that sits over the air intake hole and whistles at the proper draw speed. Seems like a good solution.

I know many of you think this is one of the easiest full convection instant on portables to use. I wonder if those people are getting more even extraction then me or are just not bothered by the wasted 10%

I think its just a different stokes kind of thing. Some people probably love the fully open airflow and have no trouble finding the right draw speed.

I think for me that is my biggest issue, perhaps it's something like without resistance to measure my draw speed against I'm kind of just all over the place. I think I would maybe enjoy a restrictor disk accessory, something to partially cover the air intake and add some resistance. Unless you can draw full force and not over power the heater maybe the device shouldn't have fully open airflow, and I don't think many portables have that kind of infinite power and heat calories. But I think I am in the minority on that opinion, I think lots of people enjoy the feeling of wide open airflow, even if they can't draw full force.


Well some interesting stuff you all said but since I'm 90% of the way there that 10% isn't really going to come from words or reading, the only think I can do is to play with my draw speed and button toggles more.

Thanks for the discussion, definitely gave me some hints for how to play and experiment next session.
Do you use glass beads in your stem?
 

namasteIII

Well-Known Member
Nope. I use the standard glass with 1 metal screen the most. I also use a wood stem from Dan with the wood chamber, and lastly I have a mistvape cooling stem with a metal screen. I like them all. I use the cooling stem the least right now because the adding cooling makes it harder to feel and react to the vapor, which I want to feel as much as possible right now while I am still working on my technique.
 

Dan Morrison

Well-Known Member
Manufacturer
@namasteIII , You could also try putting a piece of masking tape over the inlet hole on the bottom, then punching little holes into it. Test the draw restriction each time you punch a hole till it feels like a good spot. Then try a session with the low heater. If you're not getting vapor, pull harder.

Not a long term solution, but if the people want draw resistance, I do have some ideas for permanent solutions.
 
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