Musicians. What instruments do you play?

vapviking

Old and In the Way
Tho I'm considering a keyboard where you can set the scale, key etc, and the keys light up for notes that are in tune.
Ouch! Please reconsider your direction. Music theory can be difficult and easy at the same time. You can take the time to learn to play, say, only 7 particular notes and (almost) never the other five, eh? Or, how about only white keys, never black, for example? Not soooo difficult) There are only 12 in the whole of western music (let's not talk micro-tonal quite yet) and a keyboard lays them out in the most orderly/analog fashion of almost any traditional instrument.

The 7 form a scale, the same notes are the notes in that key, the root of the scale. They are a family that goes places together. Stick to the white keys and you are (essentially) always playing in the key of C.
(side note; play on only the 5 black keys and you automatically are playing in what is called a pentatonic scale, one that has very wide application)

Next you can apply a little magic that today's keys allow; transposing to different keys. This just shifts all the notes over by 'X' number of steps, so that when you play your C major scale the notes played come out in another key, allowing you to play in a lot of keys now.

Irving Berlin famously had an analog version of a transposing piano. He apparently liked to play on the black keys.

I'm being very simplistic with all this, I know it is more complicated. My point is that I believe it would be more rewarding for you to go through a building process that leads to a more full understanding of what's going on, as opposed to taking time to learn to follow some blinking lites - and then trying to understand why they are blinking?
Later you can absorb that there are countless variants on major scales, forming new scales and modalities. I am not anywhere near understanding that stuff, myself.

My first music lessons were 3 different short runs at piano from the age 7-12. I just hated structured practice. But we always had a piano and organ in the house, and I would fool around because I loved the sounds (and I love to sing as well). My dad took several runs at explaining the magic of the Circle of 5ths but my eyes would glaze over.
At 18 I started in with guitar, playing only by ear and by rote learning from friends. Been at it for over fifty years, and I only got more into piano again in the last 10 or 15, finally looking back to some things I'm now ready and willing to absorb about theory.

But through all my years, if I ever do contemplate theory, it involves a mental image of a piano keyboard - not a guitar. I find it much easier to understand the theory, etc, and if I want to I can then go and apply that to the guitar fret board.

Hey, sorry to get a little preachy and a little chatty this morning.

I can't imagine people in my profession being very understanding about a colleague/employee vaporising marijuana cigarettes
vaporising marijuana cigarettes?
That oxymoron aside, you just might be surprised by some of your 'highbrow' associates...but we can understand why you might not want an employer to know!
 
vapviking,
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EmDeemo

Pastor for the Church of Stop Coughing since 1849
Ouch! Please reconsider your direction. Music theory can be difficult and easy at the same time. You can take the time to learn to play, say, only 7 particular notes and (almost) never the other five, eh? Or, how about only white keys, never black, for example? Not soooo difficult) There are only 12 in the whole of western music (let's not talk micro-tonal quite yet) and a keyboard lays them out in the most orderly/analog fashion of almost any traditional instrument.

The 7 form a scale, the same notes are the notes in that key, the root of the scale. They are a family that goes places together. Stick to the white keys and you are (essentially) always playing in the key of C.
(side note; play on only the 5 black keys and you automatically are playing in what is called a pentatonic scale, one that has very wide application)

Next you can apply a little magic that today's keys allow; transposing to different keys. This just shifts all the notes over by 'X' number of steps, so that when you play your C major scale the notes played come out in another key, allowing you to play in a lot of keys now.

Irving Berlin famously had an analog version of a transposing piano. He apparently liked to play on the black keys.

I'm being very simplistic with all this, I know it is more complicated. My point is that I believe it would be more rewarding for you to go through a building process that leads to a more full understanding of what's going on, as opposed to taking time to learn to follow some blinking lites - and then trying to understand why they are blinking?
Later you can absorb that there are countless variants on major scales, forming new scales and modalities. I am not anywhere near understanding that stuff, myself.

My first music lessons were 3 different short runs at piano from the age 7-12. I just hated structured practice. But we always had a piano and organ in the house, and I would fool around because I loved the sounds (and I love to sing as well). My dad took several runs at explaining the magic of the Circle of 5ths but my eyes would glaze over.
At 18 I started in with guitar, playing only by ear and by rote learning from friends. Been at it for over fifty years, and I only got more into piano again in the last 10 or 15, finally looking back to some things I'm now ready and willing to absorb about theory.

But through all my years, if I ever do contemplate theory, it involves a mental image of a piano keyboard - not a guitar. I find it much easier to understand the theory, etc, and if I want to I can then go and apply that to the guitar fret board.

Hey, sorry to get a little preachy and a little chatty this morning.


vaporising marijuana cigarettes?
That oxymoron aside, you just might be surprised by some of your 'highbrow' associates...but we can understand why you might not want an employer to know!
Different strokes for different folks. I've been at music for over 30 years, first had guitar lessons at age 13 or so, so I'm not just starting out.

To be blunt, I'm autistic and my hands dont work as they should so I have to find other ways around the traditional approaches. I understand your point but its far more complicated than that, and my brain simply does not accept maths or music theory, but it can hear melodies, basslines, drum beats etc, all together at once. I've taught myself everything from scratch, but still have to approach things from something of an 'outsider' art perspective. I could bash my head against a brick wall for the next 30 years or I could enjoy myself, stretch my skills, learn, grow and write some music at the same time! :) As an example, I still cant keep in my head the notes on the fretboard or the keyboard, after 30 years, I still have to count thru the alphabet from C on the keyboard. I have to do everything by ear instead.

For instance, all the drums and bass on this are programmed by me from scratch. Every sound you hear in this has been edited and pitched, constructed by me, from many disparate takes by local musicians I brought in and recorded against nothing but a background of a simple drum and bass guitar loop. I do it a lot better these days, I can hear nothing but mistakes in it now, but I learned a lot. I hadnt programmed drums before, or recorded clarinet and trumpet. Trying to figure out what was going on in something so complicated really hurt my tiny mind! :D

https://soundcloud.com/ear%2Fdolemition
If that looks like cheating to some, who cares, its all about the fun and the experimentation (not saying yours saying its cheating). I like the concept of generative music, setting up systems and letting them play out, and having interaction, but not having to 'play' as I will hit bum notes continually.

I wont be following just the lights, I love them wrong notes too much! Blue notes for the win! :) But if I wanna jam live, totally in tune, I'll be able to.

EDIT: This is my usual drummer btw. If ever I credit Bob "fucking" Hotskins III on any music, it usually means its me programming Fxpansions BFD :)

 
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vapviking

Old and In the Way
Different strokes for different folks. I've been at music for over 30 years, first had guitar lessons at age 13 or so, so I'm not just starting out.

To be blunt, I'm autistic and my hands dont work as they should so I have to find other ways around the traditional approaches. I understand your point but its far more complicated than that, and my brain simply does not accept maths or music theory, but it can hear melodies, basslines, drum beats etc, all together at once. I've taught myself everything from scratch, but still have to approach things from something of an 'outsider' art perspective. I could bash my head against a brick wall for the next 30 years or I could enjoy myself, stretch my skills, learn, grow and write some music at the same time! :) As an example, I still cant keep in my head the notes on the fretboard or the keyboard, after 30 years, I still have to count thru the alphabet from C on the keyboard. I have to do everything by ear instead.

For instance, all the drums and bass on this are programmed by me from scratch. Every sound you hear in this has been edited and pitched, constructed by me, from many disparate takes by local musicians I brought in and recorded against nothing but a background of a simple drum and bass guitar loop. I do it a lot better these days, I can hear nothing but mistakes in it now, but I learned a lot. I hadnt programmed drums before, or recorded clarinet and trumpet. Trying to figure out what was going on in something so complicated really hurt my tiny mind! :D

https://soundcloud.com/ear%2Fdolemition
If that looks like cheating to some, who cares, its all about the fun and the experimentation (not saying yours saying its cheating). I like the concept of generative music, setting up systems and letting them play out, and having interaction, but not having to 'play' as I will hit bum notes continually.

I wont be following just the lights, I love them wrong notes too much! Blue notes for the win! :) But if I wanna jam live, totally in tune, I'll be able to.

EDIT: This is my usual drummer btw. If ever I credit Bob "fucking" Hotskins III on any music, it usually means its me programming Fxpansions BFD :)

I understand, we each follow and make the music that we can make, following our own path.
I think Frank Zappa may have coined the term, 'the 5,000 layers of the onion', which is a fitting descriptor of the world of music (among other things).
A buddy of mine had the privilege of taking some sax lessons from Charles Neville (he passed away a year or two ago) and said Charles was always telling him about the many facets of music; just as you start to understand one face of the cube, you turn it and reveal new things. Always new things.
 

EmDeemo

Pastor for the Church of Stop Coughing since 1849
Charles was always telling him about the many facets of music; just as you start to understand one face of the cube, you turn it and reveal new things. Always new things.
Absolutely. The learning never ends. I've had friends say 'but doesnt it ruin music, knowing how they did it?', god no, it just advances the learning and makes it more incredible. It doesnt remove any mystique, it asks many more questions than it reveals answers.

I'm lucky these days that there is the tech to help me along, otherwise I'd be stuck with random acts of noise and naive piano melodies, which in itself sounds kinda great tbh :)
 

EmDeemo

Pastor for the Church of Stop Coughing since 1849
AND ITS BACK UP! :) The mix I posted earlier in the thread that I had to delete. The video is back online :)

 
EmDeemo,
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