So What's Your Excuse.....

Discussion in 'Medical Discussion' started by lwien, Jan 10, 2017.

  1. lwien

    lwien Well-Known Member

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    We all know that exercise offers some of the absolute best mental and physical benefits that any of us can do to help not only prolong life but make the life that we do have more enjoyable. But even though we know this, we can come up with all kinds of excuses as to why we don't exercise and I have no doubt that many of us feel totally justified in those excuses especially if we feel that we have physical disabilities or physical abilities that have been compromised either from disease or injuries.

    So with that being said, I present to you an individual who has cerebral palsy and whose parents were told by his doctors that he would never be able to walk. He not only found the courage and strength to begin a body building program, but also found the courage to display his accomplishments in spite of his disabilities.

    We all have hero's we look up to. This is one of mine and it begs the question..........So what's your excuse?

    Click to play YouTube Video
     
  2. t-dub

    t-dub Vapor Sloth

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    This is the key phrase. Not only is moving in general painful for me because my disease is raging, if I exercise it triggers inflammation in my body, I swell up significantly, and end up at the rheumatologist's office with a needle in my knee/ankle/butt. For example, I rode my old mountain bike on the paved path near the river. The next day my right leg was so swollen it was stuck straight, couldn't even bend my knee. Very painful. Going grocery shopping is a full day for me requiring rest afterwards.

    I love the fact that you look up to this guy, that's great, but everyone is different and your statement "what's your excuse" is probably going to feel insulting to some.

    My sister has MS and can not even get out of bed without help. She needs full time staff every day just to stay in her apartment. What's her excuse? My brother, also has MS and damage to his inner ear so his balance is gone and he is housebound. What is his excuse?
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2017
  3. MyCollife

    MyCollife Well-Known Member

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    Click to play YouTube Video

    T-dub, let me know what you think of this. A friend of mine with disabilities similar to my own sent me the link.

    If this version of the video is cropped the rest is at the official TED site.

    I'm not trying to be a jerk by posting this. It's just a different viewpoint.
     
  4. Baron23

    Baron23 Well-Known Member

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    @t-dub is of course correct that there are a very many people for whom any level of physical activity is not longer feasible. Absolutely.

    But I believe its also true that many people do indeed look at their infirmaries as an excuse to not push themselves any longer.

    I do not hold myself out as a shining example to anyone at all....for very good reason! LOL

    But I do chose to push myself to continue to experience as much of life as I can knowing that I will pay a price the next day. That's my personal choice. But I do push to the extent that I can and try not to judge what extent others can.

    I do find this fella featured in @lwien video clip to be VERY admirable for his strength of character and will.

    Cheers
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2017
  5. t-dub

    t-dub Vapor Sloth

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    Yes, all the videos are very inspiring and I respect these people a great deal, they are an inspiration for sure. However, everyone is different, their situation is different, and sometimes the "What's your excuse" line accompanied by said video or book or whatever is really an ignorant way to treat people who are disabled. This attitude usually comes at me from people who are generally well physically and have no experience with crippling pain and disease. They mean well but have not walked a mile in my shoes, so to speak.
    Yes, I also push my limits as well, however if I misjudge I end up with raging inflammation, pain, and usually some kind of steriod or Toradol shot and a course of prednisone at the very least. This has consequences as the inflammation is destroying my body. Its painful as well.

    Like I said, everyone is different. What these videos show are people doing extraordinary things which is fantastic. However, the best approach is not to say judgmentally, "what's your excuse", it should be more like "Hey look at this incredible story, I really look up to this person. What they are doing inspires me and I think you might like it." That to me is a much more positive message.
     
  6. lwien

    lwien Well-Known Member

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    I have not walked a mile in your shoes, t-dub, but neither have you walked a mile in mine. I raised my twin boys as a single parent ever since they were 8 years old when their mom left us because she couldn't deal with their disabilities. They were both born with cerebral palsy and both are mildly retarded with IQ's in the low 70's. Now granted, the cerebral palsy that my boys have was not serious enough to confine them to a wheel chair but their CP along with their low IQ's kept them in special ed classes all the way through school.

    The one thing that I NEVER did was to allow them to use their disabilities as an excuse.....for anything and I still don't to this day. When I was raising them, I took them everywhere with me. When I went on a skiing vacation, they were they right along with me. When the ski instructor who worked with them a full day told me that my boys would never learn how to ski I didn't give up and I wouldn't allow them to either. I found an instructor who was willing to work with them along with their special needs and by the 3rd lesson, we were skiing down runs together. The same things held as well regardless if they were picked on at school or fired from a job that they really liked because they reached the level cap of their disability. Whatever it was, I demanded from them to do their very best and not use their disability as an excuse but rather look at it as an obstacle to overcome.

    Dub, I sincerely apologize if my title of this thread sounded judgmental. That was not my intent. You're right. Everyone is different. My purpose in posting this and titling the thread as I did was to "possibly" help motivate others to explore things that are outside of their comfort zone whatever that zone may be. For some, it may be running. For some, it may be walking and for some, it may be just getting out of the bed in morning. What we all DO have in common is an envelope and for most of us, we don't push on that envelope as hard as we should and believe me, I am not excluding myself here.

    The guy in that vid not only inspired me for what he accomplished, but even more because of the courage that it took in being able to fearlessly display his accomplishments ALONG with his disabilities and do so with pride.
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2017
  7. Farid

    Farid Well-Known Member

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    I have been using the excuse that it's too cold outside to run. It's not too cold to run, but that is my excuse.
     
  8. Baron23

    Baron23 Well-Known Member

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    @lwien - thank you. I also find YOU to be VERY admirable for for your strength of character, will, commitment, and love.:clap::tup::nod:
     
  9. Melting Pot

    Melting Pot Sick & Twisted

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    Click to play YouTube Video
     
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  10. GetLeft

    GetLeft Well-Known Member

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    What inspired me was hearing all the supporter.
     
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  11. Diggy Smalls

    Diggy Smalls Daily Roaster

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    For me it was about making compromises to stay active. Since my joints can't handle running (for ten years now) I walk literally all the time and every where. I walk at a minimum of 5 miles a day. It keeps my inflammation down significantly, and I can't imagine the shape I would be in if I didn't walk as much as I do. Oh, at least 1 mile a day is up a steep hill. :) I'm always sweaty when I get home!

    Anyway, I wish I could swim all the time...even in a pool...and I hate pools. But swimming is such good excercise annd it's so easy on the joints!
     
  12. CarolKing

    CarolKing Singer of songs and a vapor connoisseur

    @lwien thanks for inspiring all of us. Sometimes starting out slow and building up. I know if I don't keep my joints moving they lock up and freeze. Thanks also reminding us that it's easy to make excuses. I know not all can keep an exercise routine due to health issues. You do what you have to, to keep going. Mentally getting outside helps me to feel better and with a brisk walk even more so.

    Edit
    A wonderful story about the love and devotion of a dad. You were there to remind them to never give up and to work their hardest. It sounds like you gave them the very best in life.
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2017
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  13. OldNewbie

    OldNewbie Well-Known Member

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    Play Hard, Play Fair, Have Fun

    While simple, the thoughts behind it are complex and can be applied to many areas. On the "play hard", I think there are a couple of ways to think of it. One has to do with a balance sheet approach to life. I try to give more than I take from this life. With the exception of my parents and a few people I thought were Number 1 and flashed them a sign telling them that when driving, I think I've done pretty well. (But, not relevant to this thread.) A second has to do with trying to improve things every day. No matter how lazy, no matter how tired, no matter how sick we need to try to improve ourselves and our world every day. Even if it is just a bit.

    For example, towards the very end, the only thing my wife could do to play hard was to clean out the cat's eyes when I held him up to her. Taking the boogers out of a pet's eyes may not seem to be trying hard; in the context of having me put powder in her beverages to thicken them so she could drink without drowning, I think it was pretty good. It helped the world to have less boogers in eyes and it helped her as we all need to think we are doing what we can.

    The same with "exercise". Exercise is not the particular thing you are thinking of. It can be any of a number of things with the goal of physical improvement. Meditation might be considered an exercise although "exercise" tends to be movement in some way. There is a lot of movement each of us could do that we are not. That is where improvement may lie.

    When very young, I got ahold of the Canadian Air Force exercise plan for physical fitness. It was a calisthenic program that is coming back to being cool today with the 12 minute plans out there. The point is not to pimp the program, but to say the themes and theories of the book hold up today--50 years later. (There have been a lot of books, classes and experience past that. It is just the concepts formed habits that stayed with me.)

    There the main point is integrating movement into your life. As others have written, walking is a "best" exercise. There are others. One example had to do with energetic post-shower towel drying. Others have you switch hands when brushing your teeth, to stand on one leg when washing your hands and to stand tall every 30 minutes. (Good posture exercise. Basically, a balloon tied to the top of your head.) You can think of your own.

    The body is a complex entity with many moving parts. A key concept to training is "Specific adaptation to imposed demand." That means, the body adapts to what is asked of it. If you ask more, absent unusual conditions, it will become able to do more. If you don't ask for more, your ability to do things will lessen. (True stasis is nothing but a theoretical concept.)

    Every day, do more. Even if it is just a little bit. Even if all you can do is slightly move one arm and wipe the booger out of the eye of your cat.
     
  14. lwien

    lwien Well-Known Member

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    GREAT post ON.

    Whats also interesting about all this is that what is best for our bodies and brains is exactly what our minds fight against. What is best for our bodies and brains is change be it physical exercise for our bodies or mental exercises for our brains but, and this a a BIG but, our minds are just the opposite and will try to resist changing the status quo in any way that it can but if you step outside of yourself when your mind is mind-fucking you like this with all kinds of excuses and rationals, that little voice can actually be quite comical when you see it for what it really is when it offers up those.........."alternative facts". ;) ......(damn, I just couldn't help myself)

    For what it's worth though, I think that that phrase is going to become a part of our lexicon that we'll all use from time to time in one way or another.
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2017
  15. lwien

    lwien Well-Known Member

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  16. t-dub

    t-dub Vapor Sloth

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    So . .. have you had any joint replacement surgery yet . .. . . ? :popcorn:
     
    Last edited: Feb 24, 2017
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  17. lwien

    lwien Well-Known Member

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    Nope. Not yet. It's definitely not inevitable although it's always a possibility. Haven't had a heart attack yet and that too is not inevitable although always a possibility.

    What's your point, T?
     
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  18. t-dub

    t-dub Vapor Sloth

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    No point to make, just curious with your level of activity, and your age, about your joint wear. Many people, doing much less than you, have had hips, knees, and ankles replaced. Even when supplementing properly, which is rare, are you using that or any other means to maintain your longevity? Because of my psoriatic arthritis, I may need similar procedures moving forward. I was curious if you had just got lucky or actually had a practice that enabled you to move forward as you have.
     
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  19. lwien

    lwien Well-Known Member

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    There's been a lot of studies out there that actually show that physical activity helps to strengthen your joints and ligaments as well as maintain cartilage and bone mass, which is kind of counter-intuitive but I am mindful of the possibility of injury so I do take precautions.

    I don't use any supplements of any kind but I do watch the surface that I run on. I never run on concrete. I run on a rubberized synthetic track at a local high school but when they have football or soccer games going on, I run at the park on dirt and grass. Less shock to my joints.

    I also make sure that I'm in the right kind of running shoe that not only fits me well but compliments my foot type as well as compliments my running form. Some shoes are designed for heel stickers, others for mid-foot strikers and others for forefoot strikers. Some shoes are designed for over pronators and therefore offer a lot of stability features. Others are designed for supinators and offer a lot cushioning, and others that try to strike a happy medium. Running shoes is one product that I don't skimp on the cost of.

    Also, I replace my shoes every 500 miles even if they don't look worn. The midsoles can breakdown before much wear is shown on the outer soles.

    I also do about 20 minutes of stretching AFTER every run and I make sure that I don't run two days in a row. I run/walk 4.25 every other day. On the days I don't run, I walk a mile and half to Trader Joes to get my food and a mile and half back carrying two 15 pound bags of groceries.

    I also started this program at a very slow pace. The first week, I just walked one block and then increased the distance no more than about 10% a week and didn't actually start running until about 4 months in.

    From everything that I have read, I believe that those who are inactive are more prone to joint issues than those who are physically active.

    Does luck and genetics play a role here? Absolutely but I also try to increase the odds by running on the right surfaces, by running in the right running shoes, by replacing them often, by stretching, by eating healthy, by keeping my weight in check, and by taking rest days.

    Edit: I do take calcium and vitamin D supplements. Gotta keep dem bones healthy.
     
  20. Buildozer

    Buildozer Baked & Fried

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  21. t-dub

    t-dub Vapor Sloth

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    That, for me, is an entirely different proposition, I hope you understand. Right now, challenging my body creates dangerous levels of inflammation at every turn. I just had five of the largest syringes of fluid I have ever seen drained from my right knee. Nothing I did caused it, maybe it was stress, diet, bad luck actually trying to use the limb, etc . . . I appreciate your level of activity and I wish I was still able to do the same. My life is different, we will leave it at that.
    May I ask what you eat in general? Where do you derive your nutrition from on average? What makes up your diet? Do you utilize fermented foods, or neutraceuticals of any kind?
     
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2017
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  22. lwien

    lwien Well-Known Member

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    4 meals a day plus snacks....about 2800 calories. Try to get around 85 grams of protein a day.

    Same breakfast every day. One and half servings of steel cut oatmeal made with a half of cup of low fat milk, one sliced banana, half a cup of blackberries or blueberries, a few tablespoons of chopped walnuts and a table spoon of cinnamon all mixed up in one bowl followed up with a few mugs of freshly ground coffee....black.

    Next meal is a salad. Different kinds of salads every day. All have chopped chicken. Some have nuts, sunflower seeds, kale, carrots, spinach, cabbage, lettuce, tomatoes, corn, cheese, croutons, dried cranberries, couscous, currants, onions, etc etc.

    A snack of either an orange, an apple or a handful of blueberries.

    Next meal is another salad like the one above.

    A snack like above plus a handful of walnuts drizzled with some Turkish honey along with large serving of non-fat greek yogurt mixed with honey, cinnamon and blueberries.

    Dinner: Either a salmon steak with wild rice, spinach and zucchini or some cod with ratatouille or a vegetable and cheese pizza or a large bowl of chicken won ton soup drizzled with some Sriracha.

    Snacks of blackberries or blueberries, or walnuts or an orange plus one hard boiled egg.

    Red meat about 3 times a month consisting of a rare kobe roast beef and jalapeƱo munster sub from a local Italian restaurant which would take the place of one of the salads.

    On another note, I feel for ya T. It seems like every day I hear that inflammation seems to be the cornerstone for just about everything that ails us from arthritis, to heart disease, to cancer, etc etc etc. I just gotta remember to knock on some wood for my good fortune. My bladder though is a whole other story.....

    Keep on keepin' on, man.

    Edit: Things I don't eat at all. Hamburgers, fired foods, steaks, cookies, pies, cakes, candy, and sodas.
     
    Last edited: Feb 25, 2017
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  23. t-dub

    t-dub Vapor Sloth

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    Very nice. Unfortunately I could not partake in all of your suggestions due to the fact that I can no longer eat grains of any kind, period. Where do you get you're Kobe? I have had an amazing experience on CrowdCow.com and have acquired 100% true, verified, Wagyu genetics from Japan, from a small farm in WA that sells less than a dozen animals a year.

    Anyways, thanks for the look . . . :peace:
     
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  24. lwien

    lwien Well-Known Member

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    From this Italian restaurant across the street.......Claro's. When I order up a roast beef sub, they have a choice of regular roast beef or Kobe. Kobe's more expensive but man, there's nothing quite like it. Doesn't sound like the same quality of Kobe that you mentioned above though.
     
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  25. Diggy Smalls

    Diggy Smalls Daily Roaster

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    When u turned 30, my joint pain started in big time. I was almost 400 lbs and it hurt to even walk. My running days were over.

    My illness took my weight down drastically, and I started taking better care of myself. Instead of rubbing, I wall everywhere. Up hill. Down hill. To work and back every day. I also have a job where I'm not sitting around long hours. I also bought good shoes to support me while I'm on my feet all day.

    I walk in spite of my pain. It always helps me feel better. I wish I could swim every day, but since I can't, I walk 3 of 4 miles every day.
     
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