Cannabis News

shredder

Well-Known Member
What’s the tax situation there? I really don't like the whole idea of slapping "sin" taxes on weed. It's regressive. If Uncle Sam needs more money, I have some ideas on where they can get it, and it's not from cannabis consumers. I'm less pissed about them if the out the door price is reasonable, but still.

In Michigan there is a 10% excise tax for recreational and that is on top of a 6% sales tax.
Here is a canna tax guide .
marijuana.pdf
 

710yota

Have you heard about the boom on Mizar 5?
I'm a little worried that federal decriminalization might somehow shut down Oklahoma's free market policies. We could end up with a tightly controlled, expensive marketplace nationwide. Everyone should consider growing their own (where legal) rather than be robbed and raped repeatedly. As it stands, the blackmarket might pull the price down in expensive states and countries. I read something about a couple of states considering cutting the excessive weed tax rate.

Living in Washington state has certainly made me quite wary over the last 10 years about further marijuana legislation and regulation. Despite being one of the first to legalize still has no home grow, tiny purchase limits (100mg of thc per edible) and a 37% excise tax :cry: We gutted a thriving medical marijuana scene to support this as well, "why buy direct from grower at a farmers market when we give you fancy retail spaces" says our former liquor board. Apologies for the small rant but I see our beautiful evergreen state as everything that could be done wrong with legalization and as I said makes me very pessimistic about the ability of the federal government when my own state government has and continues to handle it so poorly. This needs to be implemented correctly in the beginning as it seems to be almost as hard to make change to policies as it was to make them policy to begin with, our efforts at making home growing legal here have no where near the interest or energy that legalization efforts did.

A little edit rereading this to say that despite all of that bitching I just did I am incredibly greatful to live here and not in one of the states still in the dark ages. I've thought recently about how we don't see Delta 8/9 for sale here in the same way as they do in KY where one of my friends are from and I suppose I can thank our flawed legal system for that.
 
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macbill

Oh No! Mr macbill!!
Staff member
Thailand

 

macbill

Oh No! Mr macbill!!
Staff member
get
 

blackstone

Well-Known Member
Indivior sees ‘huge opportunity’ for drug targeting cannabis misuse
Biotech company hopes to win first US approval for medicine aimed at people addicted to marijuana.

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77carrera3

Member
Since that first article is behind a paywall, can you tell us a little about what this new drug actually does?


Women respond differently to cannabis than men. Females report experiencing a greater "High" than male participants when given a relatively low dose of THC (0.015 mg/kg). Females tend to progress to tolerance and dependence faster than males after initiation of regular cannabis use.
Cannabis use is associated with improved sexual function among females, but not males. A recent study demonstrated that cannabis helps women orgasm who have difficulty having orgasms, enhances the frequency and quality of women's orgasms, and, of clinical relevance, helps women orgasm who have a female orgasmic disorder.

The behavioral and neurobiological effects of cannabis in females have different magnitudes depending on the level of sex hormones. Recent studies have investigated the interaction between fluctuations in the levels of the female sex hormones estrogen and prolactin and exogenously administered cannabinoids.

It is well known that cannabis increases prolactin release in males, causing gynecomastia (aka, man-boobs); in contrast, cannabis has no direct effect on prolactin levels in females. Female sex hormone fluctuations, especially estrogen, alter the function of the brain’s endocannabinoid system in a region-dependent manner.

While the number of cannabinoid receptors in the limbic system (a collection of brain regions that control emotional responses) does not fluctuate, the responsiveness of the CB1 receptor, the receptor responsible for allowing us to experience euphoria, becomes much greater when estrogen levels are increasing.

When estrogen levels in the blood become elevated, the pituitary levels of the brain’s endocannabinoid transmitters, 2-AG and AEA, are also significantly elevated. Taken together, these neurobiological changes might explain why women experience a greater level of euphoria at lower doses of THC.
No one currently understands the neurological mechanisms underlying these region-specific changes, and less is known about the effects of administering exogenous cannabinoids to cycling females.

One recent study reported that administration of a relatively small dose of THC induces a greater degree of anti-nociception (pain reduction) when estrogen levels are elevated. This anti-nociceptive action also correlates with a time when the endocannabinoid receptors in the PAG (a brainstem region responsible for blocking incoming pain signals) are more responsive, and endogenous levels of endocannabinoid neurotransmitters are elevated.

Estrogen does not bind directly to the brain’s endocannabinoid receptors; however, it clearly interacts with how cannabinoids, both exogenous and endogenous, influence brain function. For example, 2ithin the hippocampus, a brain region responsible for forming new memories, estrogen acts at its receptor to increase the release of the endocannabinoid AEA, which, paradoxically, increases the activity within this brain region.

The importance of these changes remains on how the brain consolidates memories to be determined. Overall, due to the regular fluctuation in sex hormones, particularly estrogen, females may be more sensitive to the pain-relieving and euphoric effects of cannabis than males.
Facebook image: Canna Obscura/Shutterstock

References
Mulvehill S, Tishler J (2022) Four theories support a hypothesis that cannabis may be a treatment for female orgasmic disorder. The Journal of Sexual Medicine, 19(5):S209-S210
Nia AB et al (2022) Sex differences in the acute effects of intravenous (IV) delta-9 tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Psychopharmacology 239 (5):1621-1628
Kim HJJ et al (2022) Impact of the mouse estrus cycle on cannabinoid receptor agonist-induced molecular and behavioral outcomes. Pharmacological Research Perspectives 10:e00950
 

Vaporware

Well-Known Member
@77carrera3 Thanks for posting! I was actually trying to find out about the one listed above it, but that one’s easy to overlook because it doesn’t have a picture next to it like the other two do.

In case anyone with a subscription wants to share some details, I’m wondering what they claim this new drug does for “people addicted to marijuana” and how it does whatever it does.
 
Vaporware,

blackstone

Well-Known Member
Since that first article is behind a paywall, can you tell us a little about what this new drug actually does?
That's a pity, it was available the other night, and I still had it open while ago until I posted the link here and closed it, doh!
I wondered why I couldn't easily link to it like the others without talk of subscription.
Anyway, from my memory of it, it targets the same receptors that work with cannabis.
But rather than replicate the feeling that you have used, I think it makes using a little less pleasurable or something along those lines, so as to gradually "wean you off" of it, as they put it.

I have in the past wondered if you could take something safe that would eliminate a desire to use cannabis, and how that might work out or if I would like to try it.

@77carrera3 Thanks, but I think they meant the article above the one you assisted with. Thank you for helping nonetheless!
 
blackstone,
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cybrguy

Putin is a War Criminal

florduh

Well-Known Member
Cannabis has a long history of relatively safe use in humans. This drug made by a company that profited heavily from the opioid crisis does not.

Personally, I’d just start slowly subbing in hemp flower for normal weed before I’d let pharma bros mess around with my cannabinoid receptors. But I guess there’s no yacht money in that.
 

Vaporware

Well-Known Member
I get the role that pleasurable sensations can have in creating psychological dependence on a substance, but I think the medical industry is wrong and a bit sick in its desire to make sure nothing anyone takes feels “too good” in their opinions. :disgust:

I don’t think I often reach the level of “high” that most of you reach every day, but as a daily medical user I have to remind myself to take it at least as often as I really want it. Taking days or more off (I’ve gone more than a month before) is no problem at all on a psychological level and I have no withdrawal effects that I’m aware of.

There are certainly physical effects that I believe are very beneficial to me, but beyond the potential for infrequent dosing with no possibility of physical or mental impairment, I really don’t see how I would benefit from losing the largely positive mental effects it has on me.

Right now I can work around the impairment (I don’t use THC if I’ll be driving), and I wouldn’t mind a non-psychoactive option for those times, but while I recognize its potential role in addiction I really don’t agree with the idea that feeling too good alone is a negative side effect. Maybe Dr. Kellogg still has too much influence over modern medicine? :rolleyes:
 

710yota

Have you heard about the boom on Mizar 5?
Since that first article is behind a paywall, can you tell us a little about what this new drug actually does?

In short:
"AEF0117 is a so-called synthetic specific inhibitor that works by targeting the receptors in the brain influenced by the psychoactive ingredient in cannabis to reduce the effects of the drug."


Here is a link that will get you past the paywall! Mods can feel free to remove this part if it breaks any rules but I use 12ft.io to break through paywalls all the time, it's a great site for the cheap news addict!
 

77carrera3

Member
Indivior has said a drug it is developing to treat cannabis use disorder (Cud) represents a significant commercial opportunity amid growing concern among doctors in the US about an increase in excessive marijuana use following its legalisation in multiple states.

The UK-listed pharmaceutical company said on Wednesday it had enrolled the first patient in a Phase 2 trial of a synthetic inhibitor drug, which earlier studies suggested could help patients reduce their marijuana intake.

The drug, code-named AEF0117, is being developed in collaboration with French biotech Aelis Farma, and Indivior hopes it will become the first medicine approved in the US to treat Cud.


The disorder affects between 10 and 30 per cent of cannabis users who cannot stop taking the drug despite it causing health or social problems, according to research cited by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

“We think there is going to be a huge opportunity for us to help people with this disorder, moving forward, especially with so many people nowadays seeing this [marijuana] as a normalised space,” Mark Crossley, Indivior chief executive, said in an interview.

“Many people think that cannabis is organic and safe — and there is just a misunderstanding with regards to the potential ramifications [of addiction],” said Crossley.

He added: “There is tremendous potential for this asset.”

Indivior is seeking to diversify beyond its existing portfolio of treatments for opioid use disorder and schizophrenia as it considers a secondary listing in the US later this year.

There are an estimated 14mn sufferers of Cud in the US and 200mn cannabis users worldwide, according to UN and US data.


The global market for cannabidiol, medicinal and recreational cannabis hit $37bn last year, according to market research firm Prohibition Partners, as consumption has increased following legalisation of marijuana in Canada and 18 US states in recent years.

But legalisation and a booming commercial market has coincided with increased frequent use of cannabis and higher levels of Cud in adults, as well as children, according to a 2019 report published by the Jama network.

The report describes the increase in Cud cases as “potential public health concern”, while recognising that legalisation advanced social justice goals, including tackling racial inequalities in marijuana-linked arrests and convictions.

“Cannabis use disorder is prevalent, it is growing, particularly among young adults and late adolescents, and it has gone up since legalisation,” said Kate Wolitzky-Taylor, an expert at the anxiety and depression research centre at UCLA.

She said one of the big problems was that the types of cannabis being distributed nowadays were much more potent because they have higher concentrations of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) than was typical in previous decades.

AEF0117 is a so-called synthetic specific inhibitor that works by targeting the receptors in the brain influenced by the psychoactive ingredient in cannabis to reduce the effects of the drug. Early testing suggests it is safe, tolerable and could be effective in weaning people off marijuana, although the majority of drugs that enter Phase 2 trials end up failing in later human studies.

Christian Heidbreder, Indivior’s chief scientific officer, said a positive outcome in the Phase 2 trial could potentially allow Indivior to negotiate with the FDA to accelerate approval of its drug.

He said two late-stage clinical trials were typically required to gain approval for a new synthetic compound but it may be possible to negotiate a single trial, depending on the outcome of the second-stage study.

The US Food and Drug Administration has not approved any medications for Cud, which is currently treated using cognitive behavioural therapy or other forms of psychosocial interventions.

However, several companies such as Opiant Pharmaceuticals and Anebulo Pharmaceuticals are developing medicines to target cannabis intoxication — extreme highs that have led to an increase in hospital admissions in recent years that experts link to the rise of highly potent synthetic cannabinoids, such as Spice.


More on AEF0117 here:

 

JBone65

Well-Known Member
Indivior has said a drug it is developing to treat cannabis use disorder (Cud) represents a significant commercial opportunity amid growing concern among doctors in the US about an increase in excessive marijuana use following its legalisation in multiple states.

The UK-listed pharmaceutical company said on Wednesday it had enrolled the first patient in a Phase 2 trial of a synthetic inhibitor drug, which earlier studies suggested could help patients reduce their marijuana intake.

The drug, code-named AEF0117, is being developed in collaboration with French biotech Aelis Farma, and Indivior hopes it will become the first medicine approved in the US to treat Cud.


The disorder affects between 10 and 30 per cent of cannabis users who cannot stop taking the drug despite it causing health or social problems, according to research cited by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

“We think there is going to be a huge opportunity for us to help people with this disorder, moving forward, especially with so many people nowadays seeing this [marijuana] as a normalised space,” Mark Crossley, Indivior chief executive, said in an interview.

“Many people think that cannabis is organic and safe — and there is just a misunderstanding with regards to the potential ramifications [of addiction],” said Crossley.

He added: “There is tremendous potential for this asset.”

Indivior is seeking to diversify beyond its existing portfolio of treatments for opioid use disorder and schizophrenia as it considers a secondary listing in the US later this year.

There are an estimated 14mn sufferers of Cud in the US and 200mn cannabis users worldwide, according to UN and US data.


The global market for cannabidiol, medicinal and recreational cannabis hit $37bn last year, according to market research firm Prohibition Partners, as consumption has increased following legalisation of marijuana in Canada and 18 US states in recent years.

But legalisation and a booming commercial market has coincided with increased frequent use of cannabis and higher levels of Cud in adults, as well as children, according to a 2019 report published by the Jama network.

The report describes the increase in Cud cases as “potential public health concern”, while recognising that legalisation advanced social justice goals, including tackling racial inequalities in marijuana-linked arrests and convictions.

“Cannabis use disorder is prevalent, it is growing, particularly among young adults and late adolescents, and it has gone up since legalisation,” said Kate Wolitzky-Taylor, an expert at the anxiety and depression research centre at UCLA.

She said one of the big problems was that the types of cannabis being distributed nowadays were much more potent because they have higher concentrations of tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) than was typical in previous decades.

AEF0117 is a so-called synthetic specific inhibitor that works by targeting the receptors in the brain influenced by the psychoactive ingredient in cannabis to reduce the effects of the drug. Early testing suggests it is safe, tolerable and could be effective in weaning people off marijuana, although the majority of drugs that enter Phase 2 trials end up failing in later human studies.

Christian Heidbreder, Indivior’s chief scientific officer, said a positive outcome in the Phase 2 trial could potentially allow Indivior to negotiate with the FDA to accelerate approval of its drug.

He said two late-stage clinical trials were typically required to gain approval for a new synthetic compound but it may be possible to negotiate a single trial, depending on the outcome of the second-stage study.

The US Food and Drug Administration has not approved any medications for Cud, which is currently treated using cognitive behavioural therapy or other forms of psychosocial interventions.

However, several companies such as Opiant Pharmaceuticals and Anebulo Pharmaceuticals are developing medicines to target cannabis intoxication — extreme highs that have led to an increase in hospital admissions in recent years that experts link to the rise of highly potent synthetic cannabinoids, such as Spice.


More on AEF0117 here:

I should probably get a 30-day oxy prescription to help avoid the anxiety that comes with a T-break. You can always count on the pharmaceutical industry to do the right thing. 🤑
 
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florduh

Well-Known Member
Rupert Murdoch's assault on cannabis legalization continues.


The stigma once attached to marijuana has vanished. Nineteen states have legalized cannabis for recreational use, and politicians of both parties increasingly treat it as harmless. Asked during the 2020 presidential campaign about her pot use in college, Kamala Harris giggled and said marijuana “gives a lot of people joy” and “we need more joy in the world.” But the public needs an honest discussion of its social and public-health risks, which include violence and mental illness.

This opinion piece is so fucking stupid. I bet the author gets paid well into six figures to write absolute trash. Because a few of our many mass shooters allegedly used weed, therefor weed is making young people go on violent rampages. That's the argument.

Also, take a glance at the comment section if you're feeling a little too confident about the future of cannabis legalization. Looks like the propaganda they're pushing on Fox is working. At least with their intended audience. Not that they were really fighting for it anyway, but I'd expect the Democrats to temper their advocacy for cannabis. Because now Republicans will accuse them of trying to encourage more mass shootings.
 

invertedisdead

OG Baller
Because a few of our many mass shooters allegedly used weed, therefor weed is making young people go on violent rampages.

Everyone who smokes meth also smokes weed, so it’s no wonder cannabis has a tarnished reputation.

Had a grower friend who has to quit selling small quantities cause it promoted too many tweakers. They all smoke weed.

All these hot button issues are all bipartisan problems as they all enable each others propaganda to coexist and divide.

Liberal democrats openly support Orwellian safe-spaces to intravenously inject illegal heroin, this causes intense depersonalization and psychotic episodes which can then be kindling material for slander from across the aisle if they find even a little pot in ones system, which is commonly used to fall asleep after staying up on 3 day psychotic binges.

It’s interesting how they can spin “medical advice” into partisan propaganda, the Center for Disease Control is probably the biggest supporter of this cannabis induced psychosis concept.
 

florduh

Well-Known Member
Everyone who smokes meth also smokes weed, so it’s no wonder cannabis has a tarnished reputation.

Something tells me the mass shooters who allegedly used cannabis also drank beer. Maybe there should be a dumbass op-ed about how beer causes mass shootings. As someone who used to live near a downtown bar district and has also hung out with stoners, I can tell you which drug is more likely to cause violence. Can I get a six figure job writing drivel for the "we suck corporate America's dick from behind" rag?

Liberal democrats openly support Orwellian safe-spaces to intravenously inject illegal heroin, this causes intense depersonalization and psychotic episodes which can then be kindling material for slander from across the aisle if they find even a little pot in ones system, which is commonly used to fall asleep after staying up on 3 day psychotic binges.

It's pretty ghoulish for politicians to try and tie heroin to weed given how many of them took money from the Sacklers and other opioid pushers. A huge percentage of heroin users got started on prescription opioids. They then get priced out of the legal opioid market and end up shooting heroin. There are even grandmas who had a hip replacement who get caught up in this.
 

JBone65

Well-Known Member

I suppose everything has to be analyzed by somebody these days. The above article points out the obvious, there are no regulations concerning cannabis naming. Therefore anybody can use any label they want, and a certain strains tend to be more inconsistent than others, as if people just chose the name for marketing reasons. Durban Poison is the worst one on the list. The DP I got five years ago was special, seems worse every time since then. There are a few interesting links, like the one below about weed for stress relief on Mars.

 

florduh

Well-Known Member
I'm not that prone to cannabis induced anxiety. But I don't know if giving future Martian colonists weed will reduce their anxiety. Realizing you're going to spend the rest of your very short life working off your SpaceX indentured servitude bond, stuck in an irradiated metal tube 20 feet below the ground on one of the shittiest planets in the known universe, never to feel the sun on your skin again while high on edibles sounds pretty terrible.
 
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