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'Da Cork Bomber' - Make Shift Homemade Log Vape

Discussion in 'DIY' started by blokenoname, Apr 10, 2018.

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  1. blokenoname

    blokenoname Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    141
    Solved.
    Slide fitting washer on, grab ss tube directly above the washer with needle nose pliers and give the tube a good squeeze, so that it's slightly bent out of form. 'Sits, fits, wobbles and has space to breathe', as we say here :D

    So easy. And now tell me, why I saw this as a problem for months now!? :huh:

    Only had a nut at hand, to try this out but works fine. Off to order some washers...

    ETA/BTW: Big thanks to @Megaton for inspiration :tup:

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2018
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  2. Abysmal Vapor

    Abysmal Vapor Shaman of The Pyramid of Orlin'Malah

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    7th heaven - 666th pit (EU)
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  3. blokenoname

    blokenoname Well-Known Member

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    141
    @Abysmal Vapor

    Thx :) Just had some spontaneous brain storming with @Megaton and this was the result after some detours :D
    Also similar to @Alan 's HI sshc. Just wondered, how he fastened the washer to the tube.

    Every thread is welcome, to delve a bit deeper into the inner workings of the Woodscents. Missing out on that one, so far. (just started reading its thread here a few days ago). So I'll have a look later on. Thx again :tup:
     
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  4. Alan

    Alan Master JedHI Manufacturer

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    Location:
    Denver area
    I have been connecting the tube to a washer and fastening it down with screws long before woodscents started doing it. To connect the washer to the tube I machine a small step on the end of the tube that is just wider than the thickness of the washer. The machined portion slides through the washer and stops at the step change in diameter. I flair out the portion that extends through the washer and hammer it down until it locks the washer to the tube. It is a permanent connection. The slots in the tube must be cut after hammering the tube to the washer, otherwise they would get smashed shut. The tube stop ring is a ss retainer clip.

    [​IMG]
     
  5. blokenoname

    blokenoname Well-Known Member

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    141
    Thanks :) That looks like a solid method to fasten the washers to the tube!

    Guess, I also won't be able to exactly replicate that, given the tools and materials at hand. For one thing, I lack the machine, for machining the step :D (apart from a set of files and an old delta sander, that is). And the ss tubing, I use for my heater cover has a thickness of only 0,3 mm, which does not leave much room for a step to begin with.

    From your pics and the info you provided in your HI thread, I'd guess your heater cover is made from thicker steel tubing, than mine? 3/8" OD tube that allows for 5/16" tips... that would make its wall thickness about 0,7-0,8 mm maybe?

    So I've to improvise a bit, to make it work with my thinner cover. The base of the tube can be easily flared out a bit with some pliers due to the steel being so thin. Then I slid on an M8 DIN 126 washer (ID/OD 9 mm/16 mm) from the top, till it comes to rest on the flare at the bottom. Then I simply squeeze the tube slightly out of shape with the pliers directly above the washer, to block it from moving up again... and finally, the flared out base gets some careful hits with a hammer, making everything sit tight.
    With repeated heating and cooling cycles, the heat will also 'bake' washer and tube together, providing additional stability.
    Had only a short piece of my 9 mm ss tubing left, but that was enough for proof of concept.

    Is there maybe a tool, that would allow me to cut a dimple into the tube from the inside, so that it would form a lib or ledge on the outside? Like my tube cutter does, when I don't cut fully through, just in reverse? That would do away with the squeezing and hammering.


    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2018 at 8:40 AM
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  6. Alan

    Alan Master JedHI Manufacturer

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    Location:
    Denver area
    I am not aware of any tool that you use on the inside that allows you to create a ridge on the outside. Maybe something like three tiny ball bearings that will fit inside the tube and then you drive a tapered rod between them which forces them outward to create three dimples.
    One thing you could do is create the dimple from the outside and then install a clip to create a stop for the washer. Flare the tube on the bottom to lock it onto the washer. It might allow the heater cover to spin on the washer though.
    The first method that I used was to thread the end of the tube and then tap the washer so that it screwed on tightly. I then flared the part that extended through the washer so that it was locked in place. It turned out to be easier for me to just cut the step in the tube. I am using 3/8" OD x 5/16" ID tubing, but it will also work with 7/16" OD x 3/8" ID tubing for a larger heater cover.
    If you can just flair out the tube enough where it goes through the washer, you don't need to worry about the washer sliding back up the tube. The washer will be held down with the screws and will be holding the tube down. You can even sandwich the flared part between two washers so that the tube won't dig into the cork. Tube flaring tools are not very expensive and will do a fine job.
    Best of luck.
     
  7. Abysmal Vapor

    Abysmal Vapor Shaman of The Pyramid of Orlin'Malah

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    Location:
    7th heaven - 666th pit (EU)
    Hmm,i have to ask but i think there was some Tread milling/bohring tool.. It is the hand tool version of a metal lathe instrument ,but i cannot recall its name.. Anyway the idea is to carve a thread at the bottom and screw the washer or the nut.}
    Like this one but for metal. [​IMG]
    Edited. I think it is this one [​IMG]
    Maybe even one can add a big disc washer between two nuts,at the bottom :).
    I think there was something similar done in my Wychwood ,but instead of making threads to the tube. The maker used threaded tube which had its threads removed on a lathe everywhere but at the bottom .
     
    Last edited: Aug 10, 2018 at 3:39 PM
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  8. blokenoname

    blokenoname Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    141
    Thanks again :)

    I think both solutions, either flaring the tube at the base and letting the screws and washer hold it in place, or cutting threads and screwing the washer on (or maybe lock it in between two nuts, as @Abysmal Vapor suggested) are worth a try. Thread cutter and a flaring tool come inexpensive enough and will come in handy anyway.
    So I can give both solutions a spin and see, what I like best.
     
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  9. blokenoname

    blokenoname Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    141
    Though I will definitively proceed with using stainless steel washers plus screws to fasten the heater cover to the wood or cork base eventually, I've to wait for the thread cutter and flaring tool to arrive first, before I can continue down that road. Also looking for a ss washer, with a bigger outer diameter than the M8 16 mm ones, I've got now. 20 mm would be ideal, I guess.

    In the meantime, I also explored further alternatives for fastening the heater cover, which, though I'll probably won't implement them myself, might still be useful for some folks here, when reading this thread and wanting to do their own DIY log:

    One alternative I pondered, was using a Teflon washer for a base. I'm aware, that for some folks here the use of PTFE seems quite contentious, but from what I've read so far, it's regarded as quite safe up to 250°C, and even the minimal degradation occurring from >200°C (though also regarded as quite unproblematic for human beings at these low amounts) should be a non issue here, as temps at the base of the heater cover are way below that and also, the washer isn't in the airpath to begin with.
    So, as I had a small PTFE rod at hand anyway, I cut a washer from it and gave it a spin.
    Had it running for a few hours on full blast now in a resistor Misty unit and there's really no outgassing, odor or freaky taste detectable so far.
    Heater cover is a bit flared at the bottom, so it can't slip out of the washer, once it's screwed on.

    [​IMG]
     
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  10. virtualpurple

    virtualpurple Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    1,236
    I really appreciate all this. I’m trying to keep a mental list right now of what tools I will need to pick up to make something like this happen!
     
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