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The Chinese SJK Induction Heater and The VapCap

Discussion in 'DIY' started by Hackerman, Jun 28, 2018.

  1. Egzoset

    Egzoset Vaporist of Borg

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    No pain, no gain.
     
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  2. Hackerman

    Hackerman The Fool

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    @7oli5 I love the long DDave glass wand but any Vapcap will work. The reason I like the glass wand is because it stays nice and cool, even though it it placed inside the induction heater coil while heating the tip. The induction heating doesn;t affect the glass, only the metal tip so the glass stem stays cool.

    When I use my stainless Vapcap, after a dozen re-heatings, the stem starts getting hot because a little bit of it gets inside the heating coil and gets heated up with the tip. With the glass wand, no matter how far the glass part is inserted, it never gets hot.

    Not a big deal if you're a light smoker. But, I chain smoke the VapCap so the stem can, sometimes get a little hot.
     
  3. LesPlenty

    LesPlenty Well-Known Member

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    it not an adjustable fuse, it is just a fuse, if your unit ever stops working you can access the fuse there.

    Most definitely get a DDave wand, glass will stay cooler in the IH than say a M vapcap, the glass will also mate perfectly with any water pipe(bong) you might want to try. (I love a vapcap through glass and water)
     
  4. -dab8-

    -dab8- Dabsessive

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    Does the Omni heat up in an induction heater? As far as I know titanium doesn’t heat up so it would just be the cap, like the glass wand, right?
     
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  5. nosmoking

    nosmoking Fogmonger

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    Whowever told you Ti doesn't heat? I believe the Switch uses Ti metal bowls in their induction heater specifically because of their ability to absorb/attract induction heat.
     
  6. Dank_Star

    Dank_Star In space no one can hear you purr.

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    @ Hackerman Many thanks for doing the groundwork with these devices, my order has been placed.
     
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  7. Hackerman

    Hackerman The Fool

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    Glad I could do it. I love mine. It brought my VC out of the drawer and back into daily use. I am also exploring other options for a 12v version for the car. Although a power inverter looks like the only answer there (so far).

    My goal is to convert my cigarette lighter in the car to an induction heater. :)
     
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  8. -dab8-

    -dab8- Dabsessive

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    I just know for induction burners (like stovetop) the metal has to be at least weakly magnetic, and titanium isn’t.
     
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  9. Hackerman

    Hackerman The Fool

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    I can place my Titanium tip WITHOUT THE CAP into the induction heater and it gets hot just like the stainless one. A little better, in fact.

    And, stainless is mostly non-ferrous also isn't it?

    They both work great. With or without the cap.
     
  10. Skunkport

    Skunkport Well-Known Member

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    Induction heats anything that conducts electricity by generating a current in it.

    It also heats anything that's magnetic or sticks to magnets through another process at the same time, so those materials will heat faster.
     
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  11. -dab8-

    -dab8- Dabsessive

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    Interesting. So why do some pots not work on an induction heater? Obviously aluminum conducts electricity, and does any type of steel or copper.
     
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  12. nosmoking

    nosmoking Fogmonger

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    1,387
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    DC Area
     
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  13. Skunkport

    Skunkport Well-Known Member

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    There are 'all metal' versions that work with non-ferrous pans apparently.
    The reason most don't is due to how non-magnetic metals conduct electricity, the current flows through a thicker area so has less resistance and produces less heat.
    In ferrous metals, it flows in a narrow layer at the surface and generates more heat.
    I'm stoned, that's about all I can understand right now from the explanations.
     
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  14. Hackerman

    Hackerman The Fool

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    Myth No. 3: Induction can’t be used with nonferrous metals
    This misconception ties back to the earlier discussion about the two types of heat produced by induction: Joule heating and hysteresis heating. Nonferrous metals are not magnetic and therefore have extremely low permeability — so the hysteresis heating portion of induction is lost with this material, and the process relies strictly on Joule heating. As a result, there must be a stronger magnetic field to achieve heating.

    This can be accomplished by winding more turns with the solenoid or pancake coil, which produces stronger magnetic fields that will induce enough eddy currents to get full power out of the units. For instance, on a ferrous material an operator might be able to get full power from the system with five to seven coil turns around a pipe. With nonferrous material, it may require 20 turns to get full power from the unit. This may require a longer coil, or the operator may need to run two coils in parallel.

    While this may require slightly more setup time, the benefits of induction heating help offset this through faster time to temperature and more consistent heating throughout the part.

    In addition, the ability of an induction system to heat ferrous and nonferrous materials results in a greater return on investment, since it can be used to complete more heating jobs.

    https://www.millerwelds.com/resourc...unking-4-common-myths-about-induction-heating
     
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  15. -dab8-

    -dab8- Dabsessive

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    Ah nice. Thanks for clarifying! Had no idea.
     
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  16. Hackerman

    Hackerman The Fool

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    I didn't either. I looked it up. LOL

    You guys want to see something funny. Check out the 'manual' for this heater. This has to be the worst translation job on the planet. LMAO Most of it barely (if at all) makes sense. LOL

    [​IMG]
     
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  17. -dab8-

    -dab8- Dabsessive

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    Wow... that’s a whole different level of special.
     
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  18. JigMelon

    JigMelon Well-Known Member

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    Just want to point out that it works great with my Omni. I have my bowl/cap directly hooked to glass too.
     
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  19. LesPlenty

    LesPlenty Well-Known Member

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    I just did an experiment with my Ti condenser, insert straight into centre of IH and nothing happens, now while inserted slide closer to wall of cup and the heater will engage, is this a practical demonstration of Hackermans Myth No.3 quote?:sherlock::science:
     
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  20. Ricardo

    Ricardo Well-Known Member

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    This is one of the many things I don't understand. Pots and pans on induction hobs don't get hot until you throw (say) a steak on on to cook. I thought we'd be extracting the moisture from the weed in the form of vapor???
     
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  21. Hackerman

    Hackerman The Fool

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    If I stick my Ti or stainless tip (WITHOUT THE CAP) into my heater it clicks on immediately and works instantly.

    I just ordered another one of these. I am going to do some testing when I get it. First order is finding out what that adjustable pot does. Then, I want to convert it to 12v for auto use.

    Once I get it and take it apart, I'll post the pics and info in this thread.

    Perhaps we can find a way to tweak this to our each and personal preferences.
     
  22. -dab8-

    -dab8- Dabsessive

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    It works like it turns on, or like it actually gets hot?
     
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  23. JigMelon

    JigMelon Well-Known Member

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    If I'm not mistaken, when the unit is on, the coil is not engaged until a device is inserted far enough (proximity sensor) AND there is a magnetic response foreign to the unit. For example, putting your finger in while it's on will not trigger it because it isn't at all magnetic. The click he's referring to is the click it makes when the coil is engaged. If what I've said is true, then the engaging of the coil suggests that the energy is able to be transferred through the material, which is therefore getting hot.
     
  24. -dab8-

    -dab8- Dabsessive

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    But... titanium isn’t magnetic, so could it cause a magnetic response?
     
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  25. Hackerman

    Hackerman The Fool

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    Location:
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    It gets hot as fuck. Burned my finger testing it. LOL

    Someone else who has one of these, stick your Ti (or stainless) tip in without a cap and tell us what happens.

    And, mine gets hot almost instantly. I am guessing right now but I would say it has something to do with the fact that our traditional coil is fat wire and has only a few winds. The coil in the dental heater is fine wire wrapped a zillion times around the spool.

    Once I get my next unit and start reversing it, we should have all the answers.
     

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