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Cannabis Ruderalis

Discussion in 'Vaporizables' started by little maggie, Feb 21, 2017.

  1. little maggie

    little maggie Well-Known Member

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    2,641
    I was looking at the dispensary I use and noticed this which is neither indica or sativa. Anyone try this?
     
  2. muunch

    muunch hotboxing the cockpit

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    1,186
    Should be higher CBD and lower THC but would definitely be interested in learning more info.

    If they're half decent, they seem like they'd be amazing for a small spacebucket-type grow. They're pretty tiny and autoflower which is sweet af
     
  3. CarolKing

    CarolKing Singer of songs and a vapor connoisseur

    I found this on Leafly
    You may already know the differences between indica and sativa varieties of cannabis, but have you heard of cannabis ruderalis? According to Jorge Cervantes, grow guru and author of The Cannabis Encyclopedia, “Botanists disagree as to whether c. ruderalis qualifies as a separate species or subspecies.” So, to answer some of the questions we receive about cannabis ruderalis and autoflowering genetics, Leafly has put together a quick background on this lesser-known classification of cannabis strains.

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    The Origin of Cannabis Ruderalis
    The term ruderalis stems from the root word ruderal. In the plant world, a ruderal species is one that grows in spite of its environment being inhabited by humans or being otherwise affected by naturally occurring disturbances to the area. Many believe ruderalis to be a descendant of indica genetics that adjusted to the harsh climates and the shorter growing seasons of the northern regions where it originates. Cannabis ruderalis is native to areas in Asia, Central/Eastern Europe, and specifically Russia, where botanists used the term "ruderalis" to classify the breeds of hemp plant that had escaped from human and cultivation, adapting to the extreme environments found in these climates.

    Originally, cannabis ruderalis was considered a wild breed of cannabis. However, in recent years it has been brought indoors to influence new hybrid varieties.

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    Properties of Cannabis Ruderalis
    Cannabis ruderalis is a short and stalky plant, especially when compared to its sativa and indica counterparts. It typically sits between 1 and 2.5 feet tall at harvest, with a rugged and shaggy growth pattern that produces wide leaflets that express themselves in a light green hue. The buds from the ruderalis plant tend to be small but still relatively chunky, and are supported by the sturdy, thick stems.

    What really sets ruderalis apart is its flowering cycle that is induced according to its maturity instead of being activated by the photoperiod like indica and sativa varieties. Modern ruderalis hybrids usually begin to flower between 21 and 30 days after the seeds have been planted, regardless of the light cycle. This is why most ruderalis hybrids are attributed as “autoflowering” strains.

    Effects
    The effects of cannabis ruderalis alone are minimized by its naturally low concentrations of THC. However, the stability and short lifecycle make ruderalis versatile and attractive to breeders who want to take advantage of its autoflowering trait. Ruderalis genes offer the ability for breeders to create an autoflowering hybrid with the advanced potency and flavor profile from its genetic partner.
     
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  4. C No Ego

    C No Ego Well-Known Member

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    916
    I've gotten some strains with that bred in.... the bud looks great then you open it to find a stem the size of Kansas in there.. ps, don't tell Kansas he he
     
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  5. Accept

    Accept Well-Known Member

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    400
    Autoflowering strains were the inspiration to grow again. It's a challenge to get them as big as possible before they automatically flower, but there's no worry about light leaks. Fine to keep the lights on 24/7 beginning to end. Interesting that they're beginning to compete with traditional photo strains in the marketplace.
     
    howie105 and Alexis like this.
  6. Whissmu

    Whissmu Well-Known Member

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    I only growing Autoflowering (coming from rudelaris) outdoors and when summer ends, I am not in favor of putting the Autoflowering under one indoor many people get spectacular productions .. but loses all attraction for me when Not being able to clone .. I like Keep a selected into indoor gene selected for several years ... every cannabis is wonderfull only i select mi strains principal interest and keep for a long time :leaf:
     
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  7. Accept

    Accept Well-Known Member

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    400
    Understandable, so it's surprising that seed-grown autos can compete with cloned photos. May switch to photos, but learned a lot growing autos. Why wouldn't you start autos outside as early as you can and get multiple crops through the summer? Just curious, can't grow outdoors.

    C. ruderalis plants have fewer fronds on their leaves and are more like house plants than crop plants. This one (reputedly) has an Afghani indica genetic background.

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    Last edited: Apr 11, 2017
    duckTape, C No Ego and Whissmu like this.
  8. Whissmu

    Whissmu Well-Known Member

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    244
    The reason is that there would be many plants in my garden ...
    Before harvesting the regular plants ,i sow the autoflowering and thus dissimulate the number of plants!
    Another reason is that I do not invest in autoflowering seeds, as I said I prefer to clone after selecting my strains, so I just have a few seeds from a gift...
     
    Hjalmark likes this.
  9. HighSeasSailor

    HighSeasSailor Well-Known Member

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    198
    Fascinating thread, I was aware of the ruderalis species but I've never heard of it being sold. From all I've read it's not a particularly prized plant for consumption but I'd never pass on a chance to try it out.
     
    C No Ego likes this.
  10. Accept

    Accept Well-Known Member

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    400
    If its available at a dispensary, it's probably an autoflowering strain that will have similar effects and flavor to its indica/sativa parent. The ruderalis traits appear to be separable from cannabinoid production.
     
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  11. Accept

    Accept Well-Known Member

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    400
    Apologies for double post but discovered a related use for ruderalis that may better explain its presence in dispensaries. Several breeders have created "fast" F1 hybrids of popular strains. It seems what they've done is bred a marketable auto version and then back-crossed this to its indica/sativa parent. The photosensitive trait appears to be dominant, so the F1 is once-again photosensitive. However, it retains the riotous vegetative growth and fast flowering of ruderalis. It should also restore some of the desirable indica/sativa traits that may have been lost in breeding the auto. On top of that, F1 hybrids are generally more vigourous than either of their parents. This could all be a big plus for commercial producers (as well as hobbyists and consumers). Can't wait to try growing one!
     
  12. KidneyStoner

    KidneyStoner Well-Known Member

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    56
    Ruderalis is terrible. It's the redheaded step child of cannabis. The only "usefulness that comes of it is when they mix it with strains to get Auto flowering plants, which is also a joke. Once I hear of a strain being crossed with Ruderalis, I look elsewhere for my seeds.
    I'd stay clear of all the Ruderalis crap.
     
    Marihuana and C No Ego like this.
  13. EverythingsHazy

    EverythingsHazy Well-Known Member

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    948
    People who write off auroflowers don't know what they are talking about. At this point, many top autos have almost no ruderalis genes, aside from the autoflowering trait. They can also be bred to stabilization in a short period of time, so that even without clones, the offspring have very uniform genotypes/phenotypes.
     
  14. KidneyStoner

    KidneyStoner Well-Known Member

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    56
    Thanks for your statement, but I most certainly know what I'm talking about.
    Ruderalis is a waste of time and effort.
    Clones? Who is trying to clone an auto?

    If people want to mess around with unstable phenos, have no chance of cloning, having to constantly buy seeds, and grow small Auto flowering plants then it's their perogative, but it's not for me.
    Ruderalis is pretty much hemp. THC content is pretty much 0%. For those whom are still learning about Sativa/Indica/Ruderalis, look it up and decide for yourself.
    I'll take strong Sativa/Indica photo strains any day of the week. Not being able to clone them is a huge turn off for me and many others as well. Not to mention most strains have a very small, unpredictable yield and are still not stable.
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2017
  15. KidneyStoner

    KidneyStoner Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    56

    That plant is a perfect sample of an auto. (Nothing against you or your plant at all ;) ) Looks to be about 6-7 weeks into flower and it's going to yield less than an ounce when cured (looks more like a half ounce or so). To spend $10+ on a seed, I want to get some weight and be able to continue the genetics with clones.
     
  16. EverythingsHazy

    EverythingsHazy Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    948
    You are completely ignoring the fact that aside from the autoflowering trait, well bred autoflowers have almost no ruderalis in them. The best ones, bred past f7, are also almost 100% uniform. There are no various phenotype in those. It's simple genetics.
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2017
  17. Accept

    Accept Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    400
    Thanks! Generally, got about two ounces per plant. With a recent photo grow, got four, but it took longer. (Also, upgraded lamp, so it's not a good comparison.) The champion growers at autoflower.net report yields of over a pound per plant.

    Also, all but one auto (Sugar Black Rose from Delicious) gave multiple phenos. So did this recent photo.
    With commercial growers cloning, imagine there's little demand for reliable seeds. Surprised to find only a few strains described as true-breeding by their breeders.

    Introducing ruderalis traits into the gene pool could be risky, but patient breeders should be able to isolate ruderalis' desirable traits. Its bad reputation might be due to breeders selling seeds before they'd done the number of crosses needed.
     

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