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Cannabis News

Discussion in 'Cannabis News and Activism' started by vtac, Jun 26, 2008.

  1. OldNewbie

    OldNewbie Well-Known Member

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    621
    If history repeats itself, just one. But, the penalty for failure is high.

    Click to play YouTube Video
     
  2. His_Highness

    His_Highness In the land of the blind, the one-eyed man is king

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    1,867
    Is it just me or does fucking around with the president elect by lighting up to at the inauguration to make a point seem ..... counterproductive to the cause?
     
  3. Fat Freddy

    Fat Freddy FUCK CANCER TOO !

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    @His_Highness

    "Is it just me or does fucking around with the president elect by lighting up to at the inauguration to make a point seem ..... counterproductive to the cause?"


    I know what you mean, BUT with Trump who the hell can predict!?


    FF
     
    Last edited: Jan 5, 2017
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  4. macbill

    macbill Gregarious Misanthrope

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    Location:
    The Evergreen State
  5. Baron23

    Baron23 Well-Known Member

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    America’s $6.7 billion marijuana habit, mapped

    The marijuana industry is at a crossroads. Voters have approved recreational marijuana measures in eight states plus the District of Columbia. When these laws become fully implemented in the next few years, more than one in five American adults will live in places where they can walk into a store and legally purchase marijuana.

    According to one estimate by ArcView Group, a marijuana industry consulting firm, the legal marijuana market rang up $6.7 billion in sales in 2016.

    Legal or not, millions of Americans already use marijuana regularly. According to the most recent National Survey on Drug Use and Health, 8.3 percent of Americans age 12 and over -- 22 million people -- used marijuana on a monthly basis in 2015. And close to 37 million people used marijuana at least once that year.

    The latest data release from that survey breaks those numbers down even further, looking at marijuana consumption at the state level. It finds that there's considerable variation in the prevalence of marijuana use by (cont)

    I made my son cannabis cookies. They changed his life.

    It took me awhile to perfect the cookie recipe. I experimented with ingredients: Blueberry, Strawberry, Sour Diesel, White Widow, Bubba Kush, AK-47 — all strains of cannabis, which I stored, mixed with glycerin, in meticulously labeled jars on a kitchen shelf. After the cookies finished baking, I’d taste a few crumbs and annotate the effects in a notebook. Often, I felt woozy. One variation put me to sleep. When I had convinced myself that a batch was okay, I’d give a cookie to my 9-year-old son.

    At the time he was consumed by violent rages. He would bang his head, scream for hours and literally eat his shirts. At dinnertime, he threw his plates so forcefully that there was food stuck on the ceiling. He would punch and scratch himself and others, such that people would look at the red streaks on our bodies and ask us, gingerly, if we had cats.

    But when I got the cookies right, he calmed down. His aggressions became less ferocious and less frequent. Mealtimes became less fraught. He was able to maintain enough self-composure that he even learned how to ride a bike — despite every expert telling us it would never happen.

    I realize that some people may look askance at parents who keep pot in the house, let alone conduct semi-legal medical experiments on their children. But it’s time we reexamine the cultural and legal restrictions we put on cannabis, especially as it pertains to kids. My son’s life has changed because of it.

    Since he was an infant, I’d watched my son struggle. At 18 months, he underwent two major spinal-cord tumor surgeries, only weeks apart, and was immobilized in a cast for a year. After that, the violent rages began — sometimes as many as 300 in a day (cont...and this is a really good article and worth reading in full IMO)






     
    Last edited: Jan 6, 2017
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  6. grokit

    grokit well-worn member

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  7. Baron23

    Baron23 Well-Known Member

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    That's a loooong, coooold, daaaark winter up there...got to do something, eh? LOL
     
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  8. Baron23

    Baron23 Well-Known Member

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    2,565
    DC mayor: Arrests for pot smoking unlikely at inauguration

    WASHINGTON — Washington’s mayor says police won’t be looking to arrest people for smoking marijuana in public on Inauguration Day.

    Pro-pot activists are planning to give away 4,200 free joints during the inauguration, which is legal in the District of Columbia. They’ve also pledged to light up during President-elect Donald Trump’s inaugural address, which is not.

    Speaking at a news conference on Friday, Democratic Mayor Muriel Bowser said police and city leaders want to see people peacefully exercising their First Amendment rights. Bowser says arrests for smoking pot “wouldn’t be our first priority.”

    Possession of up to 2 ounces of pot for recreational use has been legal in the District since 2015. Growing pot at home and giving it away are also legal. Buying, selling and smoking pot in public are illegal.
     
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  9. macbill

    macbill Gregarious Misanthrope

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    Location:
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    Marijuana brands can trademark almost anything, except marijuana

    Though cannabis is legal for recreational or medicinal use in 28 states, it remains illegal under federal law. As a result, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office will not register trademarks for marijuana retailers or for products that contain cannabis.
     
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  10. macbill

    macbill Gregarious Misanthrope

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    Location:
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  11. CarolKing

    CarolKing Singer of songs and a vapor connoisseur

    Legal Marijuana Sales Reached over 6 Billion last year in North America

    BY ANTHONY MARTINELLI ON JANUARY 3, 2017BUSINESS, MARIJUANA NEWS
    [​IMG]

    There was $6.7 billion in legal cannabis sold last year in North America, according to a new report by Arcview Market Research. The report isn’t available until February, but was obtained early and reported on by Forbes.

    According to the report, the $6.7 billion in legal cannabis sales represents a 30% increase from the prior year, a massive increase for any industry.

    “The only consumer industry categories I’ve seen reach $5 billion in annual spending and then post anything like 25% compound annual growth in the next five years are cable television (19%) in the 1990’s and the broadband internet (29%) in the 2000’s”, says Tom Adams, Arcview’s Editor-in-Chief.

    The group projects that by 2021, legal cannabis sales will surpass $20 billion annually. This includes sales in the four states that legalized cannabis in the U.S. in November; California, Maine, Nevada and Massachusetts. The numbers also take into account projected sales in Canada, which is expected to legalize cannabis this year.

    “One of the biggest stories was the alternative forms of ingestion,” says Troy Dayton, ArcView’s Chief Executive Officer. “Concentrates and edibles are becoming customer favorites versus traditional smoking.”

    When asked about whether or not he’s concerned about the incoming Trump Administration, and the effect it might have on the legal cannabis industry, Dayton doesn’t seem too worried, noting that Trump has always said he supports the rights of states on this issue. “It’s one of the few things he has been consistent on,” he says.

    For their report, Arcview uses data from BDS Analytics that includes millions of individual transactions at cannabis retail outlets/dispensaries.
     
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  12. MyCollife

    MyCollife Well-Known Member

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    123
    Anyone have extensive details about the MJ Freeway issue?

    Basically, I've read that a nation-wide POS system for dispensaries was taken down. I don't think any of them can operate unless this system is up and running. Check twitter @mjfreeway
     
  13. grokit

    grokit well-worn member

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    It's probably the "russians" again :suspicious:
     
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  14. damm

    damm Well-Known Member

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    Location:
    Pacific Northwest
    mjfreeway.com is hosted on EC2; so it's possible they just had a few instances go down and they had to restore from backups?

    At least that's what I get from https://twitter.com/MJFSupport
     
    grokit likes this.
  15. Baron23

    Baron23 Well-Known Member

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    Lawmaker scrutinized over medical marijuana ties removed from key panel


    Fenit Nirappil January 9 at 5:33 PM
    A Maryland state lawmaker who came under scrutiny for his ties to a medical marijuana business while working on legislation shaping the industry has been removed from the health committee that oversees such bills.

    Del. Dan Morhaim (D-Baltimore County), a physician, will serve on the judiciary committee in the 90-day legislative session starting Wednesday, following 13 years on the Health and Government Operations Committee.

    House Speaker Michael E. Busch (D-Anne Arundel) announced the change Monday when he released committee assignments. (cont)

    Who works in the cannabis industry? A new trade association ad campaign shows its employees.


    The cannabis industry is trying to show a different face — one that is far from a stoner stereotype.

    The National Cannabis Industry Association, a trade association, has launched a new website and series of digital ads showcasing the stories of people who work in the cannabis industry, including a former Marine and older woman who turned to marijuana for relief after having a knee and hip replacement. The politically-focused ads are a first for the marijuana industry and will run in the Washington, D.C., area.

    Their launch coincides with congressional hearings for president-elect Donald Trump’s choice for attorney general, Sen. Jeff Sessions (R-Ala.) Sessions is a longtime opponent of marijuana legalization, and many in the industry fear he could crack down on the burgeoning industry, if confirmed. Pro-marijuana activists are expected to protest outside his hearing on Tuesday.

    “Cannabis businesses generate billions of dollars in economic activity and support tens of thousands of jobs,” said Aaron Smith, executive director of the National Cannabis Industry Association. (cont)
     
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  16. OldNewbie

    OldNewbie Well-Known Member

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    621
    Tattoos and marijuana use are not necessarily disqualifying for the Air Force.

    http://federalnewsradio.com/defense/2017/01/air-force-mellows-pot-tattoo-policy/

    The new policy states an addiction or substance-related disorder still disqualifies someone from service. But using marijuana before service without any legal proceedings associated with the act no longer disqualifies someone from service.​
     
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  17. Baron23

    Baron23 Well-Known Member

    Messages:
    2,565
    Sessions on enforcing federal marijuana laws: ‘It won’t be an easy decision’

    In his Senate confirmation hearing on Tuesday, Sen. Jeff Sessions, President-elect Trump's nominee for attorney general, declined to say whether he'd adhere to the more lenient marijuana enforcement guidelines adopted by the Obama administration's Justice Department in states that have legalized medicinal or recreational marijuana use.

    "Would you use our federal resources to investigate and prosecute sick people who are using marijuana in accordance with their state laws, even though it might violate federal laws?" Senator Patrick Leahy (D.-Vermont) asked.

    "I won't commit to never enforcing federal law, Senator Leahy," Sessions replied. "I think some of [the Obama-era guidelines] are truly valuable in evaluating cases," he added. "Using good judgment about how to handle these cases will be a responsibility of mine. I know it won't be an easy decision, but I will try to do my duty in a fair and just way." (cont)

    Survey: Two-thirds of cops say marijuana laws should be relaxed

    A Pew Research Center survey of nearly 8,000 police officers finds that more than two-thirds of them say that marijuana use should be legal for either personal or medical use.

    The nationally representative survey of law enforcement, one of the largest of its kind, found that 32 percent of police officers said marijuana should be legal for medical and recreational use, while 37 percent said it should be legal for medical use only. An additional 30 percent said that marijuana should not be legal at all.

    Police are more conservative than the general public on the issue. Among all Americans, Pew found that 49 percent supported recreational marijuana, 35 percent supported medical marijuana only, and 15 percent said the drug should not be legal. (cont)

    The 'immaculate conception' problem: Maryland medical marijuana growers must break law to grow plants

    Maryland's would-be medical marijuana growers face a conundrum known as the "immaculate conception" problem: How do you grow legal marijuana plants when it's a felony to obtain the seeds?

    The first step in growing state-sanctioned legal marijuana is to break the law, a paradox that has regulators nationwide looking the other way while growers keep mum about how they start their businesses.

    "It's a bizarre little legal problem that no one addresses," said Leah Heise, an attorney and CEO of the national advocacy group Women Grow. "States just turn a blind eye to it, and thus far, the federal government has turned a blind eye to the sprouting up of these plants."

    In Maryland and nearly all states that have legalized some use of marijuana, setting up a growing operation involves a state and federal crime. Without exception, moving seeds or young plants — known as clones — across state lines is a felony. Even in states where recreational marijuana is now legal, the medical marijuana plants that fed its precursor industry originally came from illegal sources, industry experts said.

    "If you're going to open up a business growing in a state where marijuana was illegal, where are you going to get those plants?" Heise said. (cont)





     
    Last edited: Jan 11, 2017
  18. howie105

    howie105 Well-Known Member

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  19. OldNewbie

    OldNewbie Well-Known Member

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    Does the mismatch make the news "fake"?

    [​IMG]
     
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  20. TwistedGray

    TwistedGray Well-Known Member

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    Just bought some CBIS stock :)
     
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  21. howie105

    howie105 Well-Known Member

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    One persons fake is another another persons reality., be it religion, governmental type or information sources. Like most things in life it really comes down to how discerning one is about what they are told or sold.
     
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  22. OldNewbie

    OldNewbie Well-Known Member

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    621
    I understand situational ethics and how there should be avoidance of absolutes. But...there was a false part in the news as presented. All the bars on the chart were the same even though the numbers they purportedly represent were substantively different.

    Either the numbers or the bars are "fake" in that that at least one is untrue. If one's reality determines both are true, then that reality is illogical.

    Of course, that's not what is usually meant by "fake" news. If the term is definable at all, it seems to get to motivation and not to result. News is not "fake" because it is not true, it is "fake" because the publisher intentionally lies about it for some reason. That is basically the point of the question. In the case of the picture, I would say the mismatch does not make it "fake" because it is false, even though it may be "fake" depending on the reason for the bars (or the number) mismatch. (We might suspect the bars are wrong while a drug warrior may think the numbers are wrong. Why they are wrong is the key.) This gets to another problem with the theory of "fake" news.

    How much negligence is required to have something rise to the level needed to make something fake? Having laid out a few pages a time or two in my life, I suspect the numbers are correct and the editor just put in the bars as a place holder to be adjusted later to reflect the actual facts and someone dropped the ball and it didn't get done before publication. Certainly negligent in publication, but does it rise to the level of "fake"?

    I personally feel the attack on fake news is an attack on news that disagrees with the attacker. Since no one but the worst partisans will accept censorship of those they disagree with, the fake news meme was born. But, as long as we're here, it seems reasonable to bring clarity to what is meant by the term.
     
    grokit likes this.
  23. OldNewbie

    OldNewbie Well-Known Member

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    621
    Some bad news on the front:
    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/health/a...y-slams-drug-s-medical-benefits-unproven.html

    Marijuana does raise the risk of getting schizophrenia and triggers heart attacks, according to the most significant study on the drug's effects to date.

    A federal advisory panel admitted cannabis can almost certainly ease chronic pain, and might help some people sleep.

    But it dismisses most of the drug's other supposedly 'medical benefits' as unproven.

    Crucially, the researchers concluded there is not enough research to say whether marijuana effectively treats epilepsy - one of the most widely-recognized reasons for cannabis prescriptions.

    The report also casts doubt on using cannabis to treat cancers, irritable bowel syndrome, or certain symptoms of Parkinson's disease, or helping people beat addictions. ​
     
    MinnBobber likes this.
  24. TwistedGray

    TwistedGray Well-Known Member

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    425
    That's okay @OldNewbie my INSY stock is still up :)
     
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  25. MinnBobber

    MinnBobber Well-Known Member

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    3,327
    ...............................................................................................

    The above statement shows how totally incompetent and totally biased this study is. It lacks the basic simple analysis of REAL RESULTS, not some figures from some research project but from real life meaningful examples that get totally ignored.

    I have personally communicated with dozens of "epilepsy families" , through personal conversations while I was testifying at State Health Dept, Medical Cannabis meetings and online. Every single family reported monumental improvement of their epilepsy ravaged kids, ranging from a child with 100 seizures a day and now months of zero or one seizure a month, to maybe the worst report being "only" a 95 % reduction in seizures, so only having 5% of previous seizures and much less violent.

    Epilepsy is BY FAR the easiest condition to show how miraculous cannabis is. I use it as a barometer---if a group says the verdict is not in on mj and epilepsy, they are incompetent or dogmatic mj haters.
    Anyone with the smallest desire to find the truth can find hundreds of reports of miracle healing.

    Yet, they have the audacity to say there is not enough research---- open your fucking ears and your fucking minds. This makes me mad as kids and adults are going thru hell cuz these aholes won't let them access a miracle medicine that has never killed anyone cuz:
    we need more research-----the mantra of cannabis haters

    Our state just rejected giving some training to Dr's in cannabis, in regard to opioid use and deaths. Health Comm said there was not a preponderance of evidence that cannabis could be helpful in dealing with prescription painkiller deaths (just 16,000 a year) . So, no training.
    Again in real life, which doesn't count to a great stonewalling agency, states with a MMJ program had 24.8% fewer prescript painkiller deaths. But real life numbers don't count, we need a good ol research study...
     
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