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Cannabis News

Discussion in 'Cannabis News and Activism' started by vtac, Jun 26, 2008.

  1. macbill

    macbill Gregarious Misanthrope

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  2. C No Ego

    C No Ego Well-Known Member

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    I could see em now- one guy screaming= It's CBD dammit! the police officer screaming it's Marijauana !!! neither knows what the hell it is !
     
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  3. tepictoton

    tepictoton Well-Known Member

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    a funny place called earth
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  4. Sick Vape

    Sick Vape Solar Dabs

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    Guinea
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2019
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  5. hans solo

    hans solo Left coast Canada

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    The herb will survive it has been consumed for 10000 years!
    Without a single overdose death I might add!
     
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  6. Sick Vape

    Sick Vape Solar Dabs

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    :tup: I mean I don't even go into the recreational-medical discussion. I consider "real cannabis" to be medical or more medical than pills too. It probably needs both.

    Note the language of the letter. "Dear Excellency" Are we talking to kings or what? I thought "excellency" was for the pope. lol


    Edit: seems to be the official term for heads of international organisations too. So be it.
     
    Last edited: Feb 3, 2019
  7. hans solo

    hans solo Left coast Canada

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    236
    My take on the subject comes from a fully legal country.
     
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  8. cybrguy

    cybrguy I mean really, WTF

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    Quit braggin... :lol:
     
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  9. macbill

    macbill Gregarious Misanthrope

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  10. cybrguy

    cybrguy I mean really, WTF

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    That should read "One Paranoid lawmaker..."
     
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  11. ClearBlueLou

    ClearBlueLou unbearably light in the being....

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    They’re so used to their base believing the stupidest shit they can come up with for the last 40 years, I’m really not surprised...a tobacco-state shill for Big Tobacco waving the bloody shirt of ILLEGAL DRUGZ!!!1 in an effort to keep mentholated tobacco products on the shelves.

    Are he and Louie Gohmert having a competition to see how idiotic one can be in public and still get re-elected?
     
    Last edited: Feb 4, 2019
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  12. OldNewbie

    OldNewbie Well-Known Member

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    While I agree Barr is just a tobacco toady trying to keep it real, the link between menthol and cannabis was made in the news during the time Canada was considering removing menthol.

    It does not make the wholly-owned weenie of the tobacco industry right, its just that there are a TON of idiots out there who wrote articles in major publications over a year before Mr. Stupid Head (R) spewed his bilge linking the two.
     
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  13. cybrguy

    cybrguy I mean really, WTF

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    Wouldn't it be nice if they both stepped over that line? It won't be because they got more idiotic, that ship has already sailed. It would be because the people of those states moved the line more towards sense and sanity.
    Sadly I don't have much hope that will happen...
     
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  14. macbill

    macbill Gregarious Misanthrope

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  15. C No Ego

    C No Ego Well-Known Member

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  16. OldNewbie

    OldNewbie Well-Known Member

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    The more things go around...

    http://theleafonline.com/c/business/2014/05/cannabis-as-currency/

    The use of cannabis as a de facto currency predates the founding of the United States and may be found in the historical record in the early 17th century. In Hemp: Lifeline to the Future, Chris Conrad notes that “hemp was used for money in most of the Americas from 1631 until the early 1800s” (1st Ed., p. 24). It was one of many de facto currencies prevalent in the region before British Parliament passed the homogenizing Currency Act of 1751; faced with competing notes of fluctuating value issued by thirteen separate colonial governments, many colonists preferred the congruity and stability of easily measured commodities like beaver skins, tobacco leaves and, yes, hemp. The practice of trading hemp seeds became so commonly accepted that many colonial governments passed laws allowing colonists to pay some or all of their taxes in hempseed, including Virginia (1682), Maryland (1683), Pennsylvania (1706) and Massachusetts (1735).​
     
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  17. macbill

    macbill Gregarious Misanthrope

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    Pot Smokers Have More Sperm, New Study Shows

    When you get high on marijuana, your sperm gets high too—pot has been linked to lower sperm counts and concentrations.

    But a new study, published Tuesday in the journal Human Reproduction, found that isn’t true with both current and former marijuana smokers, who had higher levels of sperm concentration than men who had never tried marijuana.
     
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  18. cybrguy

    cybrguy I mean really, WTF

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    6,635
    They're just creepers is all...
     
  19. cybrguy

    cybrguy I mean really, WTF

    Messages:
    6,635
    First bill emerges this year to legalize marijuana in Illinois — would allow up to 24 plants at home

    Robert McCoppin and Dan PetrellaContact ReporterChicago Tribune

    A Democratic state lawmaker has filed a bill to legalize recreational marijuana in Illinois that likely goes further than other legislators prefer, but it has officially started the debate over complex legislation that will need to serve many interests.

    The bill, introduced Jan. 25 by Rep. Carol Ammons of Urbana, would allow licensed businesses to grow and sell pot, and residents to grow up to 24 plants at home.

    The measure is unlikely to pass because lawmakers are expected to act on a more restrictive proposal that’s been in the works for more than a year.

    Among the more noteworthy provisions, Ammons’ bill would allow for the creation of on-site consumption areas for customers to smoke or swallow the drug.

    The bill would also require 10 percent of the net income of a marijuana business to go to the local governing body, while also creating a relatively low 10 percent excise tax to generate state revenue. And it would include special provisions for minority business owners and communities.

    Ammons has supported legalization since before she first took office in 2015. She previously co-sponsored Rep. Kelly Cassidy’s bill to decriminalize possession of marijuana. But she may face an uphill fight getting her new bill considered.

    In Springfield, big, controversial policy changes like legalizing recreational marijuana typically don’t happen without long negotiations, so legislation introduced by a single lawmaker without such discussion may never see a vote.

    Legalizing medical marijuana in Illinois took years of debate and dealing by former state Rep. Lou Lang of Skokie, a veteran of decades at the Capitol.

    The standard operating procedure is for lawmakers to work out details behind closed doors, often with lobbyists and administration officials, before putting a proposal into bill form and holding public hearings.

    In this case, Cassidy and state Sen. Heather Steans, both Democrats from Chicago, have been working on a proposal to legalize cannabis for more than a year. They introduced a bill last year but held off seeking passage until this year, after both Gov. J.B. Pritzker and House Speaker Michael Madigan voiced support for legalization.

    [​IMG]
    Michigan legalized possession of marijuana Dec. 6, 2018, and could serve as a blueprint for Illinois’ own efforts toward legalization, though it’s possible that Illinois could actually roll out legal recreational weed first, if all falls into place.

    Advocates believe it’s an opportune time to propose legislation to legalize marijuana, with Democrats controlling the governor’s office and both legislative chambers.

    Ammons has held her own meetings with stakeholders to craft her legislation, and said she isn’t trying to disrupt the Steans/Cassidy bill, but is trying to make sure that whatever bill is passed addresses damage done by imprisoning minorities at higher rates for drug offenses.

    “The conversation needs to shift to how we’re going to address the disproportionate harm in our communities,” she said. “We want to make sure people who have been criminalized can become part of the economy.”

    Steans and Cassidy still are negotiating with various parties such as other lawmakers, the governor’s office and law enforcement, and plan to introduce a bill by April.

    “We’re working with a lot of organizations and the administration to do an updated draft of the bill,” Steans said. “It’s not going to pass before May. We may have several iterations to go to get a draft and negotiate again.”


    [​IMG]

    One obvious difference between their proposal and Ammons’ is that they would limit residents to five home-grown plants, rather than 24, citing concerns by police about home-grown plants contributing to a black market. They also are not proposing consumption areas, due to problems seen elsewhere with odors and local opposition to marijuana “cafes.”

    Like Ammons’ proposal, Steans and Cassidy would expunge certain nonviolent drug offenses, and encourage minority ownership of marijuana businesses and investment in minority communities.

    As an indication of how various interests will fight over how to divvy up tax revenue from the new industry, Ammons’ bill would create a 10 percent excise tax on marijuana and send 30 percent of the proceeds to a state school fund; 50 percent to the General Fund; and 2.5 percent each to the State Employees Retirement Pension, Teachers Retirement System, State Universities Retirement System and to Illinois State Police, to hire and train drug enforcement officers.

    Her bill would allow existing medical marijuana businesses to sell recreational pot as well, but she said the new program should include a majority of minority license holders. To prevent poorer entrepreneurs from being priced out, as with medical marijuana licenses, she would limit application and licensing fees to $5,000.

    To present their proposals, both Ammons, and Steans and Cassidy, plan to hold town hall meetings on the issue before legislative hearings.

    “It’s a big subject,” Ammons said. “We can’t rush it through.”

    Opponents hope to make their voice heard at any upcoming hearings.

    Brian Fengel, president of the Illinois Chiefs of Police Association, said his group members want to negotiate with legislators to minimize the danger from people driving while high, and they want funding to train local police on recognizing drugged driving.

    In contrast to many black lawmakers, such as Ammons, the Illinois NAACP has been reported to oppose legalization.

    Drugs have already done too much damage in minority communities, said Tim McAnarney, lobbyist for Healthy and Productive Illinois, a coalition of anti-marijuana organizations. “We don’t understand how putting more drugs into those communities is going to help them,” he said.

    Decriminalization has already addressed overdue concerns about arrests for small amounts of marijuana, McAnarney said. He also supports new proposals to expunge past convictions as well.

    If marijuana is legalized, the coalition hopes to at least eliminate home-grown pot, McAnarney said, because some of it will inevitably supply the black market. And the coalition adamantly opposes edible cannabis candies, soda pop and other treats that appeal to children.

    Whatever legalization looks like, McAnarney said, it will never raise enough money for all the special interests fighting over a slice of the pie.

    “There’s no amount of taxation,” he said, “that would raise enough money for all the people who think they’re going to benefit.”
     
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  20. macbill

    macbill Gregarious Misanthrope

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  21. Magic9

    Magic9 Plant Enthusiast

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  22. ClearBlueLou

    ClearBlueLou unbearably light in the being....

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    COMPLEAT bullshit...a young friend of mine gave me a few hash-oil lollies with a warning that they were *very strong* and not to finish one in less than a day. Got nothing from a half, nothing from the other half, got nothing from a whole one.

    Tasted good, tho....

    On the *previous* topic, “SB 420”, that’s some grade-A manure as well...I offer the following for your contemplation:


    The Cannabis Restoration Act

    Preamble:

    WHEREAS the plant species known collectively as Cannabis sativa has provided humankind with paper, cloth, rope, medicines, glues balms, and benefits of every sort for centuries; and


    WHEREAS Cannabis has made these gifts freely available to all people without injury, harm, or ill-effects to the user, the farmer, the processor, the purveyor for the entire history of human knowledge and utility thereof; and


    WHEREAS the prohibition of Cannabis has deprived industries of all kinds of important raw materials, to their impoverishment; the medical profession of an important aid in tending human health and well-being inexpensively and effectively; farmers of an important crop of many uses to field and livestock; and the people of a ready source of ease, comfort, and enjoyment to their detriment; therefore


    IT IS THE INTENT OF CONGRESS to right these wrongs by overturning the improper and unwise removal of Cannabis and all its products from human activity and commerce, in spite of the best advice of business, medicine, industry and the public and in contravention of the norms of productive human activity; and in doing so, restore cannabis to the fields and farms and homes and hospitals of the Citizens of these United States, where it was once of the greatest value and utility for many purposes great and small.


    To this end, the honorable Men and Women representing the nation hereby declare the removal, effective immediately, of cannabis in whole and in part, from the Schedule of Controlled Substances; the elimination of all federal laws, regulations, and penalties heretofore enforced against the plant cannabis, its parts and products, and against those who have produced, provided, and / or made use of any part or portion thereof; the abrogation and nullification of all laws and regulations, at the State, the County, and the Municipal levels, that have been instituted for the purpose of governing, controlling, limiting, prohibiting, and / or punishing the cultivation, processing, and / or distribution of said plants, parts, and portions, and the customary uses thereof; the immediate release of all persons tried and convicted and sentenced, in consequence of the laws and regulations nullified by this Act; the expungement of criminal records for all those of all those individuals so released, and the termination of any and all interdictions, disqualifications, and ineligibilities suffered by said persons described herein.


    FURTHER, we entreat the President to negotiate with our treaty partners an end to any and all such provisions of any treaty, to which our Nation is Signatory, as may violate the expressed purpose and intent of this Act.


    CONSEQUENT to these purposes, and in acknowledgement of the fact that certain Cannabis products may be rightly intended for consumption, we direct and empower the Department of Agriculture to institute systems whereby such consumable products may be certified as free from toxic additives and unwholesome admixtures, and further, free of inert additions, so that the availability of honest weights and measures, and truthful and accurate representation of such, may be assured to commerce and the public.

    =============
    I know, I’m the Wall-O-Text King...still, I hope people will find fault with my model legislation there, kick it around, improve it...it’s an important thing, TOO important to be left to the main beneficiaries of the status-quo. Many thanks!
     
    Last edited: Feb 12, 2019
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  23. macbill

    macbill Gregarious Misanthrope

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  24. ClearBlueLou

    ClearBlueLou unbearably light in the being....

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    This may be the first time a court has stood up to LEO confiscation since it was officially blessed by the GOP in 1984
     
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  25. OldNewbie

    OldNewbie Well-Known Member

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    Um...huh?

    The Comprehensive Crime Control Act of 1984 was introduced by a Democrat in the House (Members were 272 D and 183 R.) and passed with a 316-91 vote and then a similar bill passed by the Senate by voice vote. (Usually reserved for non-controversial measures.) Senate make up was 55 R to 45 D. The bill went to conference and came out with the House approving 252-60 and the Senate 78-11. Then, Reagan (R) signed it.

    How that indicates any greater blessing by the GOP over the Democrats is a little above my pay grade.

    -------
    Edit:
    At http://reason.com/volokh/2019/02/20/supreme-court-rules-that-excessive-fines#comment , it is claimed the plaintiff (Timbs) was represented by the Institute for Justice. The seed money and much support for that organization is the Koch brothers and it is said to lean libertarian.

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Feb 20, 2019 at 3:37 PM

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